canthus

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Related to medial canthus: lateral canthus

canthus

[′kan·thəs]
(anatomy)
Either of the two angles formed by the junction of the eyelids, designated outer or lateral, and inner or medial.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Saline irrigation into the medial canthus showed excellent drainage through the tube.{Figure 2}
Approximately 20% of eyelid malignancies occur in the medial canthus. It is a risky area because of lacrimal structures: the puncta, canaliculi, and the nasolacrimal duct.
The vertical diameter of LSC was measured under the eye-closing conditions (LSC top to the junction of LSC and nasolacrimal duct), anteroposterior diameter (the widest distance between the front and rear sidewalls of LSC), trans diameter (the widest distance between the right and left sidewalls of LSC); the vertical distances from LSC top and bottom to the medial canthus and skin were measured.
On external examination, a soft prominence was noted in the right medial canthus. Flexible nasoendoscopy revealed the presence of a polypoid mass that had emerged from the left middle meatus and prolapsed into the nasal cavity (figure 1).
Qian, "Reconstruction of upper eyelid and medial canthus following basal cell carcinoma resection: a successful one-stage repair with three local flaps," International Journal of Dermatology, vol.
There was 1/3 to 1/2 of bilateral medial upper eyelid defect with redundant stump of eyelid tissue present on the medial canthus. Eyes were aligned, extra ocular movements (ductions and versions) were full.
The medial canthus remains firmly anchored to the frontal process of the maxilla.
They were also found on the medial canthus (28%), upper eyelid (10%), and lateral canthus (6%).
The entire eruption appeared to be restricted to the right upper part of the face, extending from the eyelid and medial canthus up to the frontal scalp.
Areas to be considered for full thickness grafts include the nasal ala, the medial canthus of the eye, the upper eyelid, fingers, and the ear.
Ocular habronemiasis occurs more commonly near the conjunctiva, medial canthus, nasolacrimal duct and are raised, ulcerative granulomas, often containing characteristic yellow, plaque-like sulfur granules of 1-2 mm in diameter (Pusterla et al ., 2003; Wilkie, 2004; Pugh et al ., 2014).
We present a case of periocular BCC in an 83-year-old female which involved both upper and lower lids and medial canthus and had caused ulceration and ectropion of the lower lid with persistent watery eye.

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