mediate

(redirected from mediatorial)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal.

mediate

Logic (of an inference) having more than one premise, esp, being syllogistic in form
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Dupuis, when presenting and defending his views on the church's limited mediatorial role for "the others," enlisted the support of Yves Congar.
Sensitive to the cognitive dissonance that accompanies such an awareness and the psychological propensity toward repressing ideological incompatibles when recognised as such, Kroskrity and Loether even suggest that the researcher may play a mediatorial role in promoting the success of 'positive language ideologies' (i.e.
(17) When the High Priest carried the Twelve Tribes in his breast, he summed up in himself the mediatorial role of Israel, carrying the tribes with him "in the breastpiece of "judgment" on his heart when he goes into the holy place, for a continual remembrance before the Lord".
In Memory and Narrative, Olney defines autobiographical weaving as a procedure in which the life-writer maintains a "free and adaptable, mediatorial position between the inner and the outer, the private and the public, the fixed and the changing" (419).
Thus, Cooper seeks to integrate Maximus's ascetic anthropology with his cosmically mediatorial soteriology and eschatology through the Byzantine monk's theology of corporeal deification, with Christ s deified humanity as the linchpin.
Turretin begins his exposition of Christ's kingship with a crucial distinction that shapes his subsequent articulation of matters pertaininig to the two kingdoms doctrine: "Before all things we must distinguish the twofold kingdom, belonging to Christ: one natural or essential; the other mediatorial and economical." As clearly indicated in the discussion that follows this statement, Turretin identifies what Calvin referred to as the civil kingdom and the spiritual kingdom.
According to Alan James (2001:20), who acknowledges Watson and Markowitz, along with Gideon von Wielligh (1919-1921), as his forerunners, Watson and Markowitz both aim "to provide accessible and persuasive literary versions of the translation texts as products that are at the same time aesthetically instrumental and responsibly mediatorial of the texts from which they draw their life." (5)