Futility

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Futility

See also Despair, Frustration.
American Scene, The
portrays Americans as having secured necessities; now looking for amenities. [Am. Lit.: The American Scene]
Babio
performs the useless and supererogatory. [Fr. Folklore: Walsh Classical, 42]
Bellamy, James
character who goes through phases “playboy, war hero” to suicide. [Br. TV: Upstairs, Downstairs]
Canute
king of England demonstrated the limits of his power by commanding waves to stand still in vain. [Eng. Legend: Benét, 165]
Danaides
fifty daughters, forty-nine of whom are condemned to Hades to collect water in sieves. [Rom. Myth.: LLEI, I: 326]
Fall, The
tale of the monotonous life and indifference of modern man. [Fr. Lit.: The Fall]
Grandet, Eugénie
lacking everything but wealth, she is indifferent to life. [Fr. Lit.: Eugenie Grandet, Magill I, 258–260]
Henry, Frederic
loses lover and child; nothing left. [Am. Lit.: A Farewell to Arms]
Moreau, Frederic
law student whose amatory attachments all come to nothing, concludes that existence is futile. [Fr. Lit.: Flaubert A Sentimental Education in Magill I, 876]
“Necklace, The”
having lost a borrowed diamond necklace, M. and Mme. Loisel suffer ten years of privation to purchase a duplicate, then find that the original was paste. [Fr. Lit.: Maupassant “The Necklace”]
Ocnus,
the cord of eaten by ass as quickly as it is made. [Gk. and Rom. Myth.: Wheeler, 767]
Of Mice and Men
story of George Milton and Lennie Small’s futile dream of having their own farm. [Am. Lit.: Of Mice and Men]
Partington, Dame
tried to turn back tide with mop. [Br. Hist.: Brewer Dictionary, 807]
pearls before swine
Jesus adjures one not to waste best efforts. [N.T.: Matthew 7:6]
Sun Also Rises, The
story of American expatriates living a futile existence in Europe. [Am. Lit.: The Sun Also Rises]
Tobacco Road
tale of Jeeter Lester and other oppressed, degraded lives. [Am. Lit.: Tobacco Road]
Tregeagle
condemned to bail out Dozmary Pool with leaky shell. [Br. Legend: Brewer Dictionary, 1099]
References in periodicals archive ?
(16.) Medical Futility in End of Life Care: report of the Council on Ethical and Judicial Affairs.
As the articles in this Volume attest, an extensive body of literature attempts to refine a standard for the appropriate process for making a determination of medical futility. (2) Virtually all attempts at defining this process incurred criticism for vagueness or ambiguity, and for unfairly imposing subjective values on involved parties.
Thaddeus Mason Pope, Memphis University law professor and an expert on medical futility care issues, calls the Manitoba statement an "admirable attempt to provide guidance." But he finds two things lacking:
(1999) The Medical Futility Controversy: Bioethical Implications for the Critical Care Nurses.
Proceeding from those ethical principles, dialogue will need to further evolve on issues of patient self-determination and medical futility. Benefit-burden relationships will need to be explored in applying technology to the patient care arena.
Such notions as "medical futility, " however, should be used to open rather than to close conversations, except in those relatively rare circumstances in which a given treatment cannot be expected even temporarily to prolong survival.
"Futile Care": Medical futility, or "futile care," permits a doctor to withdraw wanted life-sustaining treatment from a patient based on the doctor's perception of the patient's quality of life--and, less mentioned, based on the cost of the patient's care.
Medical futility denotes treatment that cannot confer an overall benefit on the whole person even if it can restore some physiologic variable.
The term "medical futility" generally refers to interventions that are unlikely to produce any significant benefit for the patient.
If "assurance" regarding the prospects for cure is not based on "medical probability"--is based on something other than statistical "bean counting," in Groopman's dismissive phrase--then there is never a basis for acknowledging medical futility, never a moment when the premise of individual uniqueness and its implication that this patient might fall at the extreme end of the statistically rendered probability curve can be overridden.

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