Futility

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Futility

See also Despair, Frustration.
American Scene, The
portrays Americans as having secured necessities; now looking for amenities. [Am. Lit.: The American Scene]
Babio
performs the useless and supererogatory. [Fr. Folklore: Walsh Classical, 42]
Bellamy, James
character who goes through phases “playboy, war hero” to suicide. [Br. TV: Upstairs, Downstairs]
Canute
king of England demonstrated the limits of his power by commanding waves to stand still in vain. [Eng. Legend: Benét, 165]
Danaides
fifty daughters, forty-nine of whom are condemned to Hades to collect water in sieves. [Rom. Myth.: LLEI, I: 326]
Fall, The
tale of the monotonous life and indifference of modern man. [Fr. Lit.: The Fall]
Grandet, Eugénie
lacking everything but wealth, she is indifferent to life. [Fr. Lit.: Eugenie Grandet, Magill I, 258–260]
Henry, Frederic
loses lover and child; nothing left. [Am. Lit.: A Farewell to Arms]
Moreau, Frederic
law student whose amatory attachments all come to nothing, concludes that existence is futile. [Fr. Lit.: Flaubert A Sentimental Education in Magill I, 876]
“Necklace, The”
having lost a borrowed diamond necklace, M. and Mme. Loisel suffer ten years of privation to purchase a duplicate, then find that the original was paste. [Fr. Lit.: Maupassant “The Necklace”]
Ocnus,
the cord of eaten by ass as quickly as it is made. [Gk. and Rom. Myth.: Wheeler, 767]
Of Mice and Men
story of George Milton and Lennie Small’s futile dream of having their own farm. [Am. Lit.: Of Mice and Men]
Partington, Dame
tried to turn back tide with mop. [Br. Hist.: Brewer Dictionary, 807]
pearls before swine
Jesus adjures one not to waste best efforts. [N.T.: Matthew 7:6]
Sun Also Rises, The
story of American expatriates living a futile existence in Europe. [Am. Lit.: The Sun Also Rises]
Tobacco Road
tale of Jeeter Lester and other oppressed, degraded lives. [Am. Lit.: Tobacco Road]
Tregeagle
condemned to bail out Dozmary Pool with leaky shell. [Br. Legend: Brewer Dictionary, 1099]
References in periodicals archive ?
The Medical futility debate: patient choice, physician obligation, and end of life care.
In "Medical Futility, Patient Autonomy, and Professional Integrity: Finding the Appropriate Balance," Amir Halevy traces the roots of the Medical futility debate to the shift in decision-making authority between physician and patient.
Medical futility denotes treatment that cannot confer an overall benefit on the whole person even if it can restore some physiologic variable.
The concept of medical futility has been counterbalanced by the rapid advance of medical science, especially in the last several decades beginning in the 1960s, when life-sustaining medical treatments such as the mechanical ventilator became available.
Medical inappropriateness, like medical futility, is conceptually related to the goals of a particular treatment, (23) such as whether a specific treatment is likely to achieve the goals of a patient, or the goals for which the treatment is intended.
Acceptance of the concept of medical futility facilitates a paradigm shift from curative to palliative medicine, accommodating a more humane approach and avoiding unnecessary suffering in the course of the dying process.
Despite the emergence of medical futility as a dominant topic of discussion, especially as it applies to end-of-life care, the concept is not new.
It reflects a body of law on medical futility that has been evolving throughout the past 3 decades, as the wishes of patients and their surrogates sometimes have been pitted against increasingly sophisticated technology and inflexible hospital policies.
From Thaddeus Mason Pope's blog Medical Futility, quoting the amended complaint:
41) Of note, however, is that two articles addressing physician and nurse attitudes toward medical futility are from Canada and Japan; both countries with universal health insurance.
Although physicians can legally justify changing a patient's code status on the basis of medical futility without patient or family input, in practice this is rarely done.

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