megaton

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Related to megatonnes: gigaton, metric ton, Kilotonne, Metric tonnes

megaton

1. one million tons
2. an explosive power, esp of a nuclear weapon, equal to the power of one million tons of TNT

megaton

[′meg·ə‚tən]
(physics)
The energy released by 1,000,000 metric tons of chemical high explosive calculated at a rate of 1000 calories per gram, or a total of 4.18 × 1015 joules; used principally in expressing the energy released by a nuclear bomb. Abbreviated MT.
References in periodicals archive ?
1 megatonnes, amongst any of the scenarios of international cooperation.
If approved, the railway would transport 100 megatonnes of coal each year.
They are by far the largest consumers of end-use electricity and are responsible for more than 6,000 megatonnes of carbon dioxide emissions annually - equivalent to the yearly emissions of more than 1 billion cars.
They are estimated to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by approximately 8 megatonnes over 10 years, enough to take more than 1.
When Canada signed the Copenhagen Accord in December 2009, it committed to reduce its greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions to 17% below 2005 levels by 2020, establishing an annual reduction target of 607 Megatonnes (Mt), mirroring the reduction targets set by the United States.
World crude steel production reached 1,548 megatonnes (Mt) for the year 2012, up by 1.
Table 149: Canada, Reduction in GHG Emissions in Megatonnes after Deploying Energy Efficiency Improvements, 2010-2015 124
The research will help cut residential and commercial carbon emissions by 10 megatonnes per year by 2020; the equivalent of taking around 2.
Regarding large industry and industry related projects, the Government's Action Plan intends to achieve the following: (i) an absolute reduction of 150 megatonnes in greenhouse gas emissions by 2020 by imposing mandatory targets; and (ii) air pollution from industry is to be cut in half by 2015 by setting certain targets.
In the first 21 years, the regulations are expected to result in a cumulative reduction in GHG emissions of about 214 megatonnes the equivalent of removing 2.
It is expected that these regulations will reduce GHG s by 162 megatonnes between 2017 and 2025.
Total annual emissions for large industrial emitters has been capped at 55 megatonnes, emission reduction targets have been set at 15 per cent compared to business as usual, and the cost of a carbon credit has been limited to $15 per tonne.