melanic


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melanic

[me′lan·ik]
(geology)
References in periodicals archive ?
The sex differences discovered in terms of both the intensity of the melanic areas on the pronota and their relationship to size suggest male and female ladybirds may be under different pressures in terms of their use of available compounds for pigment production.
Sargent (1985) suggested that some melanic moths may be adapted to exploit white backgrounds that are variegated with black, rather than the uniformly dark backgrounds suggested by the traditional explanation of industrial melanism (Kettlewell 1958a).
Male SAP triangular, with melanic ornament on at least the proximal part.
An apparently melanic Hairy Woodpecker from New Mexico.
However, despite having similar Olsen P concentrations, P loads from the Pallic soil were greater than from either the Brown or Melanic soils.
The rise in melanic moths follows a J-shaped growth curve, but is this entirely realistic?
Melanic Ilic, Susan Reid and Lynne Attwood (Houndmills, UK, 2004), 101.
10) One of the great pioneers of early infant development, Melanic Klein, examined the emergence of a sense of self in infancy, and the characteristics of its successes and failures, in object relations theory (Klein, 1955/1994).
Conversely in less polluted rural woodland regions Kettlewell documented an inversion in melanic moth populations.
Melanic individuals were shown to be more active at low temperatures than individuals with paler coloration.
dagger]) Before 1845 near Birmingham peppered moths were primarily light-coloured, but some had darker wings and were called the melanic or carbonaria forms.