Melanosis

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Related to melanotic: melanotic schwannoma, melanotic macule

Melanosis

 

the intensified formation and deposit in organs and tissues of a dark brown or black pigment of the melanin group (normally present in the skin, retina, and meninges).

A distinction is made between congenital melanosis and acquired melanosis. The former includes congenital melanosis of the skin (melanoderma), manifested by freckles or pigmented birthmarks. Acquired melanosis frequently develops as a result of a change in endocrine function (adrenal, pituitary, or gonadal). The pigmentation may be diffuse (for example, in Addison’s disease) or circumscribed (for example, during pregnancy, on the face and around the nipples). The condition may also be caused by systemic poisoning by hydrocarbons (toxic melanoderma) or by physical, mechanical, or chemical irritation (light, heat, the distillate products of coal).

References in periodicals archive ?
Muller, "Melanotic neuroectodermal tumour of infancy: report of two cases and review of the literature," Journal of Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery, vol.
Melanotic lesions of prostate: Blue nevus and prostatic epithelial melanosis," Urology, vol.
Our patient's persistent melanotic stools draw attention to the ongoing risk of rebleeding in patients after pancreatic pseudoaneurysm embolization.
Solitary gastric melanotic schwannoma: sonographic findings.
Oral mucosal melanoma usually develops de novo in clinically normal-looking mucosa, but it has been reported that in up to one-third of cases it arises from within areas of benign oral melanotic hyperpigmentation of the oral mucosa [6].
The necrotic and degenerated tissues are removed by phagocytes and replaced by neuroglial cells, leading to the formation of cystic, melanotic and colloidal lesions at the injured site within 6 weeks after the injury.
Soon, "Solitary gastric melanotic schwannoma: sonographic findings," Journal of Clinical Ultrasound, vol.
Caption: Figure 1: Presence of several medium size melanotic lesions in the fundus and the body of the stomach.
Although Antoni A and Antoni B areas are seen in various ratios in classic schwannoma, varying morphologies have been described, including ancient, cellular, melanotic, plexiform, glandular, and epithelioid subtypes [5].
demonstrated that in A7 melanotic cells, resembling less aggressive tumor cells, anti-oxidant genes, including EPHX2, were upregulated in response to oxidative stress, while they were downregulated in G10 metastatic melanoma cells [63].
Pathological types of tumors included schwannoma (31 cases) [Figure 5], epidermoid cyst (12 cases), neurofibroma (5 cases), hemangioma (2 cases), and melanotic schwannoma (1 case).