melanterite


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Related to melanterite: copperas, sphalerite, Copiapite

melanterite

(məlăn`tərīt'): see ferrous sulfateferrous sulfate
or iron (II) sulfate,
chemical compound, FeSO4. It is known as the monohydrate, FeSO4·H2O; the tetrahydrate, FeSO4·4H2O; the pentahydrate, FeSO4·5H2
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melanterite

[mə′lan·tə‚rīt]
(mineralogy)
FeSO4·7H2O A green mineral occurring mainly in fibrous or concretionary masses, or in short, monoclinic, prismatic crystals; hardness is 2 on Mohs scale, and specific gravity is 1.90.
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References in periodicals archive ?
White epsomite fibers occur on melanterite and chalcanthite stalactites.
Green melanterite stalactites are common throughout the mine, and rarely melanterite occurs as crystals to 2 cm.
Associated minerals are: coskreaite-(Ce), levinsonite-(Y), melanterite, halotrichite, picketingite, apjohnite, epsomite and other hydrated sulfates.
The three species are virtually indistinguishable and occur together as dull, beige, yellow and yellowish white, powdery efflorescences and crusts associated with epsomite, melanterite and fibroferrite.
A relatively common and widespread late-stage mineral, gypsum occurs as small vein-fillings, crusts, and rarely as colorless, twinned, prismatic crystals up to 5 mm long, typically associated with goethite, melanterite, jarosite and hexahydrite.
Melanterite occurs as pale blue masses of curved capillary crystals, commonly associated with jarosite and gypsum.
1951; Dana, 1892) lists four unusual minerals (potash alum, epsomite, melanterite and apjohnite) from "Alum Cave.
Long, deep blue stalactites in the mine workings are referred to by the miners as "chalcanthite" but in fact usually prove to be cuprian melanterite.
Eight entries in his Catalogue of Minerals Found in Colorado are: cuprite, fluorite, jamesonite, melanterite, rhodochrosite, tetrahedrite, tennantite and zinkenite.
Whitish fuzz, tentatively identified as melanterite, forming 1-mm ram's horns, has been observed.
Nearby acidic pools contain druses of magnificent, 1-cm, transparent, blue-green crystals of cuprian melanterite.
Typical minerals formed under these conditions are water-soluble sulfates such as chalcanthite, melanterite and halotrichite, along with other more insoluble minerals such as malachite and chrysocolla.