melting loss

melting loss

[′melt·iŋ ‚lȯs]
(metallurgy)
Weight loss due to volatilization or oxidation during metal melting in a foundry.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Melting loss is limited to a certain thickness according to the journey duration and the temperatures of the seas crossed.
low melting loss due to oxidation in the furnace atmosphere;
Consequently, the metal is subjected to the high temperature zone and the direct impact of the burner gases for a short time, which reduces melting loss.
absence of local overheating of the metal enables insignificant melting loss of the alloying elements;
That's why within the whole mass of the melt the required temperature is maintained with the least melting loss in comparison with different methods of arc and electron beam melting.
However, use of a portion of the reducer for diffusion deoxidizing of the final slag is inefficient and causes just increased melting loss of silicon (Table 4).
Layers of accumulated dross will inhibit the heat transfer and further increase melting loss as the mixed layer of metallics and oxide is converted to aluminum oxide by the high hearth temperatures.
Content of phosphorus in the molten metal practically does not change, and insignificant increase of its weight share in the metal is stipulated by melting loss of carbon, silicon, and manganese.
Content of carbon and active oxygen in initial metal before ladle-furnace significantly effected melting loss of deoxidizer-elements (directly proportionally and inversely proportionally).
The cost of charge materials is virtually unaffected by overall yield because, apart from a small melting loss, one ton of charge materials is required for every ton of good castings sold.
Such process, despite seeming simplicity of its implementation, is inefficient, especially under conditions of mass production, and first of all because of the power consumption increase, increased melting loss of the alloy components, and accelerated wear of refractory lining;
Hopkins, ABC Coke/Div Drummond Co, Inc, described testing done on individual heats of various cupola charge materials to determine melting loss with the resultant data, when applied, allowing the melt department to more closely control their over the spout melting costs.