memory effect


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memory effect

The condition of rechargeable nickel cadmium and nickel metal hydride batteries in which it continues to hold less of a charge over time. It is said to "remember" how full it was when last charged because it will not charge past that point the next time. This is why you should completely drain nickel-based batteries every month or so.

The memory effect is caused by a combination of chemical reactions; however, the cadmium in a nickel cadmium battery is the bigger problem and why nickel metal hydride batteries fare somewhat better. In a fresh battery, the anode's cadmium crystals are approximately one micron across. If the battery sits in the charger too long or is not fully discharged, over time, the crystals grow to as much as 100 microns. This conceals more of the active material to the electrolyte and reduces battery life. For an exhaustive look into the world of rechargeable batteries, visit www.batteryuniversity.com. See batteries.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, they have not shown a memory effect because of their slow response.
It is an implicit memory effect. We all have good and bad primers.
To evaluate the repeatability of the shape memory effect, the same operation was repeated several times, and the recovery degree at different programming cycles was measured.
The Russian Academicians, Kurdjumov and Khandros [4], and Chang and Read [5], had widely reported the prime phenomenon of the memory effect govern by the thermoelastic behaviors of the martensite phase.
Memory effect plays an important role in the spread of disease.
This application is based on the so-called acoustical-emission memory effect, also known as the Kaiser effect (KE).
Economic research studies show that memory effect leads to abnormality in economic growth.
This requires a recurrent neural network, which incorporates loops within the network that give the network a memory effect. However, training these recurrent neural networks is especially expensive, Lu said.
Instead, the memory effect arises from quantum mechanics.
Subsequently, Bonferroni-adjusted post-hoc analyses were used to examine which types of words received old responses at different rates, and thus to document that there was a false memory effect. Furthermore, to analyze differences in true recognition and false recognition as a function of high and low BAS, we used a t-test.
Kilbourn and Eleanor Ty's The Memory Effect: The Remediation of Memory in Literature and Film (2013) focuses on the tensions that emerge when Canadian collective memory (or lack thereof) is deployed to mediate constructions of Canadian nationalism.
Such a memory effect is frequently observed as a hysteretic behavior based on appearing additional degrees of freedom and can be modeled with a fractional derivative.