memory switch

memory switch

[′mem·rē ‚swich]
(electronics)
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
After the memory switch, the mice were again put in a different environment.
This special ability of CaMKII to maintain its own activity has been termed 'the molecular memory switch.'
SEATED in a corner of the press room at the Curragh on Sunday, the memory switch was flicked on about an hour before racing when I glanced left and saw the legend standing inside the door with a quizzical look on his face.
There is a memory switch to accommodate the positions of two drivers, although strangely enough you have to operate it every time as the seats drop to a low position when you exit the car.
Align features a three-position memory switch in its motorized frame, making height adjustment nearly automatic, and all uprights and components move in relation to the worksurface height.
The programmable memory switch enables the doctor to preselect the chair's most used position.
By delivering up to 512 Intel processors on a common memory switch, and then adding over 5 billion gates of configurable logic, the SRC-6 shatters convention and promises substantial performance gains for both technical and commercial applications including Internet infrastructure."
As the story opens, the narrator, a London restaurateur and refugee, stops his car to buy gas -- and before you know it, a memory switch is tripped and we're 6,000 miles away, back in Colombo, the capital of the newly independent island of Ceylon, renamed Sri Lanka, in 1962.
Using advanced molecular genetic techniques that allowed them to temporarily inhibit the flies' memory the team were able to identify a gene called CASK as the synaptic molecule regulating this 'memory switch'.
They added electrical contacts and created a flexible memory switch that operates on less than 10 volts, maintains its memory when power is lost, and still functions after being flexed more than 4,000 times.
In the past decade, biologists and engineers have designed numerous sensors, memory switches and biological clocks that can modify existing cell functions.
In a paper published in the journal Cell Systems, researchers at MIT unveil a series of sensors, memory switches, and circuits that can be encoded in the common human gut bacterium Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron.