menarche

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menarche

[mə′när·kē]
(physiology)
The onset of menstruation.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The mean ages of Tanner breast stages 1-5 and menarcheal age of girls living in Sokoto, North-West Nigeria, were within the age ranges reported worldwide.
In this study, maximum frequency for menarcheal age was seen for the age group of 12 years and here the number stood at 110 i.e.
A study conducted in Ireland in 2006 indicated that the mean menarcheal age of Irish girls decreased from 13.52 years to 12.53 years over a range of 20 years.8 Several other countries had similar average ages of menarche.
A more recent retrospective analysis involving urban-dwelling women aged 18 years and above, reported a mean menarcheal age of 15.5 years, using the life tables approach.
Menarcheal age: We found that their median menarcheal age was 11.6 yr which was significantly earlier compared with girls in Sweden (mean 13.0 yr), Indian well nourished girls (12.4-12.9 yr) and Indian less privileged girls (14.4 yr).
(25) "Between the mid-19th and the mid-20th century, the average menarcheal age decreased remarkably from 17 to under 14 y[ears] in [the] United States...." (26) Boys begin pubertal development around 11.5 years, (27) with "[s]perm production coincid[ing] with testicular and penile growth, generally occurring at age of 13.5-14 years." (28) Sometime during puberty, perhaps one to three years after spermarche, the first appearance of sperm, the typical boy becomes reproductively capable.
Menarcheal status and parent-child relations in families of seventh-grade girls.
This secrecy is in contrast to the behavior of girls, who tell their mothers immediately, and, after an initial few months of secrecy, reveal their menarcheal status to their girl friends.
This compares with an average menarcheal age of 13 in the 1950s, and 13 years and three months in the 1960s.
Karyn Lovering's work on the problematics of the menarcheal body examines the "inscription of young girls into discourses of menstruation" and silence (p69).
Nikolova, Stoyanov, and Negrev (1994) studied functional brain asymmetry, handedness, and menarcheal age in 182 women, aged 16 to 25 years.
Although genetic makeup does play a role in menarcheal age (onset of menstruation), dancers' intense exercise, low weight, and dieting typically delay puberty by one or two years.