Mendelian genetics


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Mendelian genetics

[men′dēl·yən jə′ned·iks]
(genetics)
Scientific study of the role of the nuclear genome in heredity, as opposed to cytoplasmic inheritance.
References in periodicals archive ?
Many of the cases presented with non-classical Mendelian genetics. FMF is believed to be an autosomal recessive syndrome.
Nazi intellectuals interpreted Mendelian genetics as validation of Nazism's concepts of racial purity.
Those of you who remember Mendelian genetics from your schooldays will know that for a recessive characteristic to emerge it is necessary for both parents to be carriers.
However, the largest gains were observed in questions related to the use of a Punnett square to solve Mendelian genetics (Q23 and Q24) and to understanding the relationship between cellular functions and cell division (Q31).
Such traits, which defy the predictions of classical Mendelian genetics, are also found in mammals.
[We might add a caveat here: epigenetic studies suggest that inheritance is more complex than Mendelian genetics and such complexity is beyond the scope of junior high school Biology.] The goal of teaching students about evolution is to secure a better understanding of neo-Darwinism.
Maternal obesity may alter pups' body-weight-controlling mechanisms in a way not described by traditional Mendelian genetics. Instead, this programming may result from what's known as an "epigenetic mechanism."
Mendelian genetics and lifestyle risk factors play only a limited role in most childhood tumors, so routine screening and risk reduction efforts aren't emphasized.
Burbank had begun his work before Mendelian genetics that revealed the mechanism of inheritance became widely accepted, and he rejected some of its sterner dictates (in some cases correctly, Smith notes).
While most geneticists ridiculed the idea that this was possible, (1,2) there have been some weak attempts to apply Mendelian genetics to the story by Jacob choosing spotted sheep that were homozygous (that is, two identical DNA sequences at one locus) rather than heterozygous (that is, two different alleles at one locus).
Other topics include orthology and functional conservation in eukaryotes, mammalian meiotic recombination hot spots, epigenetic control of centromere behavior, Mendelian genetics of apomixis in plants, and immunoglobulin somatic hypermutatoin.
And as Ruse shows us (Chapter 1), although only few were originally convinced that natural selection can be the cause of evolution, the 20th century integration of Darwinian selectionism and Mendelian genetics definitively confirmed that Darwin started the major revolution in our thinking about the nature of evolutionary process.