mendicant

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mendicant

1. (of a member of a religious order) dependent on alms for sustenance
2. a mendicant friar
References in periodicals archive ?
Unfortunately, there is a mafia running the business of mendicancy. These people are hand in glove with authorities meant to eradicate beggary and have full freedom to install beggars at key public places where public turnover is high and eventually high income for both parties.
This study is about literary mendicancy and more specifically about betting poems, says Papoutsakis, not about beggars and their poetry.
This means is necessary, and we know how hard the mendicant friars--Bonaventure in particular--fought so that their mode of life, implying above all mendicancy, would be considered a legitimate expression of evangelical life.
Mendicancy is a matter of taste and temperament, no doubt.
Pensioners are living in despair and many families have been reduced to mendicancy. Dreams have been shattered and hopes dashed.
He had no conception of a spiritual mankind rising out of its animal mendicancy by practicing the Golden Rule of non-coercive exchange, each one in this spiritual relationship creating subsistence for many others and being in turn multiply served, thus extending human life progressively towards its immortal dream instead of merely reproducing it in starved and shortened lives.
Decolonisation that is a licence for mendicancy is a misnomer.
Allison Edgren focuses on the ambiguous character of mendicancy in the Franciscan Order.
He favorably cites the comment of Bruce Golding, the former prime minister of Jamaica who "repudiated this attitude and called on the region to 'purge this mendicancy'" (p.
The woman, who entered the UAE on tourist visa, was sitting on the ground preying on people's emotions and humanitarian spirit, seeking alms through mendicancy to provide for her daughter's wedding expenses in her home country.
One such small famer was Rudolph Franklyn, who had tired of a life of mendicancy which was the only one available to most workers, and joined the movement of the Rastafari.