menhir


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menhir

(mĕn`hēr') [Breton,=long stone], in archaeology, name given to the single standing stones of Western Europe, and by extension to those of other lands. Their size varies and their shape is rough and squared, tapering toward the top. See megalithic monumentsmegalithic monument
[Gr.,=large stone], in archaeology, a construction involving one or several roughly hewn stone slabs of great size; it is usually of prehistoric antiquity.
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Menhir

 

the simplest type of megalithic structure, consisting of a single block of upright stone sunk into the ground. Menhirs measure 4-5 m high and more; the highest one is in France, and it stands 20 m high and weighs about 300 tons. Menhirs some-times form long avenues (as in Karnak) or are sometimes ar-ranged in a circle (cromlechs). Apparently, they had a religious significance. Most of the menhirs are in northwestern Europe, but some have been found in Asia and Africa. They are common in the USSR in certain parts of Siberia and the Caucasus.

REFERENCE

Schuchhardt, C. Alteuropa, 4th ed. Berlin, 1941.

menhir

A prehistoric monument consisting of a single large standing stone, sometimes rudely sculptured.

menhir

a single standing stone, often carved, dating from the middle Bronze Age in the British Isles and from the late Neolithic Age in W Europe
References in periodicals archive ?
After dinner, was the time to answer questions about the wine varietals and Miriam Daniele Marangelli, the brand ambassador of Menhir Salento vineyard, answered questions about the wine, in rapid Italian.
Similar propuesta se ha presentado, a falta de confirmacion, para el menhir antropomorfo de Kurtzegan.
Aishwarya Pastapur, who spelled the Dutch homonym "mynheer" for "menhir," admitted she "cried for a few days" after tying for second place.
Archaeologists Sarah Semple and Howard Williams show how prehistoric monuments (barrows, stone circles and menhirs, earthworks) retained symbolic power throughout the Anglo-Saxon period, long after their original uses had been lost or altered.
Menhir, nighthouse, the refusing tomb of your long stone blade.
Harrisson (1958) suggested a connection between these three forms, for instance, instead of elevating an upright menhir, one could have placed a bridge across a ditch, or any of those combinations.
In these collections the "great, sky-thrusting gray menhir" of "Aspen Leaf in Windless World" reveals itself to be a remembered thing too, the "cromlech [...] the taciturn tall stone" that looms up in what is consistently the last poem, and thus "the last thing remembered," in these self-selected anthologies, "To a Face in the Crowd."
Islanders still place flowers on the 4000-year-old menhir statue at the gate of St Martin's church, she's called grandmother of the cemetery and is probably the goddess of fertility.
Menhir alignments were, according to these interpretations, landing strips for spaceships.
And also last year it bought UK companies MSB Consultants and Menhir Ltd to speed up it expansion into Europe.
La Iglesia cristiana redispuso, en el nuevo espacio del templo, "los tres elementos principales del culto druidico: la piedra megalitica (menhir o dolmen) se convirtio en la piedra del altar; la fuente bautismal...
The scientists carved a replica of a menhir out of a single piece of carbonate rock, a flat-topped pyramid measuring 2.4 meters high and 1.6 meters across at its base.