meniscectomy


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meniscectomy

[‚men·ə′sek·tə‚mē]
(medicine)
Surgical removal of a meniscus or semilunar cartilage.
References in periodicals archive ?
Yet another investigation, a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, sham-controlled study conducted in Finland involving 146 patients, compared sham surgery to arthroscopic partial meniscectomy.
The latest study, published in July in BMJ along with an editorial condemning these surgeries, found that among 140 middle-aged patients with medial degenerative meniscal tears but no accompanying osteoarthritis, no significant difference in patient-reported pain, symptoms, knee function or other knee-related quality of life was found during two years' follow-up after arthroscopic partial meniscectomy as opposed to a sub-group receiving neuromuscular and strength training over 12 weeks.
Patients with the most painful and acute presentations and those with hamstring weakness were most likely to cross over from PT to arthroscopic partial meniscectomy in this trial," commented Dr.
Chondropathies developed after arthroscopic meniscectomy in our patient group (194 cases), we aim to share our 6-year long follow-up.
More recently, Vangsness et al reported (15) a randomized, double-blind, controlled study on adult human MSC delivered via intra-articular injection to the knee following partial medial meniscectomy.
The procedure - called partial meniscectomy - aims to relieve symptoms o knr that are due to a tear in a meniscus, one of two pairs of cartilages that cushion the knee joints, by removing the torn fragments and then trimming up the edges.
5,7,9,12,14) Partial meniscectomy for torn meniscus may be considered, if conservative measures fail, but it is possible to live with a torn meniscus if activity is judicious.
Arthroscopic meniscectomy for discoid lateral meniscus in children.
The surgery is an arthroscopic procedure called a partial meniscectomy, and doctors perform it to relieve pain and other symptoms associated with a tear in the knee's meniscus.
This study tested the hypothesis that a small intraoperative dose of Ketamine improves postoperative analgesia that lasts for several days, hence facilitating ambulation after arthroscopic meniscectomy (Menigaux et al.