capacity

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capacity

1. a measure of the electrical output of a piece of apparatus such as a motor, generator, or accumulator
2. Electronics a former name for capacitance
3. Computing
a. the number of words or characters that can be stored in a particular storage device
b. the range of numbers that can be processed in a register
4. the bit rate that a communication channel or other system can carry
5. legal competence

capacity

[kə′pas·əd·ē]
(analytical chemistry)
In chromatography, a measurement used in ion-exchange systems to express the adsorption ability of the ion-exchange materials.
(computer science)
(electricity)
(science and technology)
Volume, especially in reference to merchandise or containers thereof.

capacity

2. The volume contained in a vessel.
3. The maximum or minimum water flow obtainable under given conditions (e.g., specified conditions of pressure, temperature, and velocity).

capacity

As it pertains to airports, it is the ability of an airport to handle a given volume of traffic. It is a limit that cannot be exceeded without incurring an operational penalty.

capacity

(communications)
The maximum possible data transfer rate of a communications channel under ideal conditions. The total capacity of a channel may be shared between several independent data streams using some kind of multiplexing, in which case, each stream's data rate may be limited to a fixed fraction of the total capacity.

capacity

With regard to computer and information systems, capacity refers to the storage and transaction processing capability of computer systems, the network and/or the datacenter. See capacity on demand and storage capacity.
References in periodicals archive ?
During the time of familial, corporate and professional disturbance strengthening of mental capacity is badly required.
Previous studies have found that mental capacity assessment instruments can provide a standardised basis for systematically evaluating important abilities that are integral to mental capacity, and that such instruments can offer enhanced reliability for such assessments.
It is considered that their legal situation corresponds to the total lack of mental capacity.
This had led to a huge increase in demand for specialist legal services surrounding mental capacity and conflict issues.
This was reiterated by the court in the Rottenberg case where it was held "that a decedent who did not possess sufficient mental capacity could not effect a change of domicile either at the time of admission to a hospital or afterwards" (Estate of Sadie Rottenberg, 19 Misc 2d 202, New York County Surr.
Mental Capacity Act and Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards is a six month learning activity particularly appropriate for social workers with added reflective log, registered manager and untrained social care workers.
Since the introduction of the Mental Capacity Act (MCA) and Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards (DoLS) in the UK six years ago, professionals have worked with people with diminished mental capacity in entirely new ways, including in assessment, clinical care, and long-term disposition.
The lawyer in question, Rich Hutton, told the judge that the troubled actress did not have the mental capacity to understand the nature of the legal proceedings, TMZ.
If you think your father may still be able to complete an LPA you should seek legal advice, although you may need a medical opinion on your father's mental capacity if there is any doubt regarding this.
This paper examines mental capacity as a medico-legal social construct and concludes that, while the construct works reasonably well in the contexts of property-related transactions and health-treatment decisions, it is deeply problematic and is a source of dysfunction in the context of guardianship and guardianship-type interventions.
During a presentation at the National Conference on Philanthropic Planning in San Antonio, Texas, Marcia Inger Navratil and Laura Hansen Dean of The University of Texas at Austin discussed the issues that arise when a donor's mental capacity become an issue.
According to our definition, wisdom is a mental capacity of combining intelligence with moral virtue in the process of gaining knowledge and acting.