mental illness


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Related to mental illness: schizophrenia

mental illness

any of various disorders in which a person's thoughts, emotions, or behaviour are so abnormal as to cause suffering to himself, herself, or other people

mental illness

disease of the mind. Mental illness varies from transitory episodes of anxiety or depression (see NEUROSES) which interfere with normal daily living through the mood changes involved, to the PSYCHOSES which may require in-patient psychiatric treatment to control the severe changes in mood and behaviour associated with them.

A sociology of mental illness has developed as a response to epidemiological studies which have pointed to social causes of mental illness (e.g. depression and bad housing), and from the impetus of the theories of the anti-psychiatrists, such as LAING (1960) and Szasz (1961). See also ANTI-PSYCHIATRY, MADNESS.

mental illness

[′men·təl ′il·nəs]
(psychology)
Any form of mental aberration; usually refers to a chronic or prolonged disorder in which there are wide deviations from the normal.
References in periodicals archive ?
In this debate, many questions arise that those discussing mental illness and gun violence may not even think about: What do we mean by mental illness?
For example, statistics show that out of every six people suffering from mental illness, five do not seek treatment meaning they or their families live in denial.
Unlike many other organizations who work solely with persons affected by mental illness, NAMI emphasizes support, education, and resources for supporting not only the person living with a mental illness but their families as well.
Historically there has been polarised debate about the treatment of serious mental illness.
8 million Danish children and their parents and focused on whether family living arrangements were different for children born to parents with serious mental illness than without.
We all are vulnerable of stress and mental illness, if stress is not released through words or tears, it may cause damages to human body part, mental patients are also a vital part of our society, they are not violent but affected from violence' Dr.
According to the guideline, the data on the number of children in New Zealand affected by parental mental health and/or addiction issues is incomplete, though data suggests approximately one in five families is affected by mental illness.
On the other hand, racism built on a foundation of mental illness cannot be modified until the underlying mental illness is addressed.
In view of the potential effect of parental mental illness on their children's wellbeing, prevention and intervention at an early stage are of great importance.
The biggest obstacle to the treatment of mental illness is the stigma.
Although some may believe that improving symptoms of mental illness is more likely to lessen the risk for future episodes of violence, in fact, reducing substance abuse has a greater influence in reducing violent acts by patients with severe mental illness, according to a new study.

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