mercury manometer

mercury manometer

[′mər·kyə·rē mə′näm·əd·ər]
(engineering)
A manometer in which the instrument fluid is mercury; used to record or control difference of pressure or fluid flow.
References in periodicals archive ?
Blood pressure was measured on the cubital fossa kept at heart level in the seated position on three separate occasions after 10 minutes of rest in a controlled environment using mercury manometer by auscultatory method.
Accuracy and reliability of the device were checked against a mercury manometer before conducting the experiments.
To measure the pascal, the SI unit of pressure, the scientific community has traditionally relied on a tall, bulky device known as a mercury manometer. Elemental mercury, which is a hazardous neurotoxin, adjusts its height in response to changes in pressure.
For 40 mm Hg Endurance test and maximum expiratory pressure test (MEPT), a mercury manometer without pressure cuff was used.
The mercury manometer is an instrument that requires skill to use.
Expiratory pressure and 40 mm endurance test were determined by using a Mercury Manometer. Expiratory pressure is recorded by taking deep inspiration & pinch the nose with left hand to prevent escaping of air from nostril, then blowing force fully in rubber tube of sphygmomanometer by single attempt pushing the mercury column up & reading was noted.
There was a mercury manometer to measure the air pressure, the ability to add oxygen to the air and a foot pump as a safety mechanism "...
The gas pressure scale which existed prior to 2008 used secondary standard piston gauges traceable to a mercury manometer known at NIST as the Gas Thermometer Manometer (GTM) (4).
The Dinamap dilemma: Inaccuracy of the commonly used Dinamap 8100 compared to simultaneous mercury manometer measurement in hospitalized patients at different levels of blood pressure.
As for equipment, the mercury manometer remains the standard.
As for equipment, the mercury manometer remains the standard, and every facility should have at least one that can be used to calibrate automated machines.
Your equipment should be checked against a standard mercury manometer at least every six months.