mere

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mere

1
1. Dialect or archaic a lake or marsh
2. Obsolete the sea or an inlet of it

mere

2
Archaic a boundary or boundary marker

mere

[mīr]
(hydrology)
A large pond or a shallow lake.
References in classic literature ?
Pathos differs from Tragedy in that Tragedy (whether in a drama or elsewhere) is the suffering of persons who are able to struggle against it, Pathos the suffering of those persons (children, for instance) who are merely helpless victims.
We should consider whether he makes them (1) merely caricatures, or (2) type characters, standing for certain general traits of human nature but not convincingly real or especially significant persons, or (3) genuine individuals with all the inconsistencies and half-revealed tendencies that in actual life belong to real personality.
But the observable fact is that the stimulus of being in the cage produces differing results with repetition, and that the ascertainable cause of the cat's behaviour is not merely the cage and its own ascertainable organization, but also its past history in regard to the cage.
I met him again not a quarter of an hour ago, and his manner was precisely the same: he merely bowed and passed on.
We have lost our way in these devilish Derby hills of thine, old man," replied Paul of Merely.
I'll merely say it's something I don't know and don't care to know.
While, therefore, an epic like the "Odyssey" is an organism and dramatic in structure, a work such as the "Theogony" is a merely artificial collocation of facts, and, at best, a pageant.
He declared them to be, like all other morals, merely an expedient for protecting a certain type of man.
sharply differing from that held by young people to-day who see in every girl merely a female seeking a mate) was, I think, of value.
But, answers one, by merely paying this tax, the poor civilized man secures an abode which is a palace compared with the savage's.
Fighting with a large army under your command is nowise different from fighting with a small one: it is merely a question of instituting signs and signals.
The famous flank movement merely consisted in this: after the advance of the French had ceased, the Russian army, which had been continually retreating straight back from the invaders, deviated from that direct course and, not finding itself pursued, was naturally drawn toward the district where supplies were abundant.