meridian

(redirected from meridianus)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial.

Meridian

(mərĭd`ēən), city (1990 pop. 41,036), seat of Lauderdale co., E Miss., near the Ala. line; settled 1831, inc. 1860. It is an important rail and highway point and the trade and shipping center for a farm, livestock, and timber area. There is also diverse manufacturing. In the Civil War, Meridian was the temporary capital of Mississippi (1863); it was destroyed by General Sherman in Feb., 1864. Meridian Naval Air Station is to the north. Nearby Okatibbee Reservoir offers recreational activities.

meridian

(mĕ-rid -ee-ăn)
1. An imaginary great circle passing through a point on the surface of a body, such as a planet or satellite, at right angles to the equator and passing through the north and south poles.
2. Short for celestial meridian. The projection of the observer's terrestrial meridian on the celestial sphere. It is thus the great circle passing through the north and south celestial poles and the observer's zenith and intersecting the observer's horizon at the north and south points (see cardinal points).

Meridian

(religion, spiritualism, and occult)

A meridian (from the Latin word for “midday”) is formed by taking a line of longitude and projecting it outward from Earth onto the celestial sphere. Another way of imagining a meridian is to picture the circle that would be formed by drawing a line connecting the north pole, the zenith (the point in the sky directly overhead), the south pole, and the nadir (the point directly opposite the zenith).

meridian

[mə′rid·ē·ən]
(astronomy)
A great circle passing through the poles of the axis of rotation of a planet or satellite.
(geodesy)
A north-south reference line, particularly a great circle through the geographical poles of the earth.

meridian

meridian
A semi—great circle joining the geographical poles. All meridians indicate a north-south direction. Every great circle joining the poles forms a meridian and its antimeridian.

meridian

1. 
a. one of the imaginary lines joining the north and south poles at right angles to the equator, designated by degrees of longitude from 0? at Greenwich to 180?
b. the great circle running through both poles
2. Astronomy
a. the great circle on the celestial sphere passing through the north and south celestial poles and the zenith and nadir of the observer
b. (as modifier): a meridian instrument
3. Maths a section of a surface of revolution, such as a paraboloid, that contains the axis of revolution
4. (in acupuncture, etc.) any of the channels through which vital energy is believed to circulate round the body
5. Obsolete noon
6. along or relating to a meridian
References in periodicals archive ?
The midday gerbil (Meriones meridianus Pallas, 1773) is medium-sized in the genus, with a head and body length of approximately 120 mm.
Meriones meridianus individuals were caught using rattraps at 25 sampling sites in the years 2004 and 2010, from March to October, in the Xinjiang, Gansu, Qinghai, Ningxia, and Inner Mongolia provinces of northwest China, at elevations ranging from -103 m to 3205 m above sea level (Fig.
meridianus from 25 sampling sites in Inner Mongolia and northwest China at elevations that ranged from -103 m to 3205 m above sea level to determine if the size of auditory bullae correlated with change in altitude.
meridianus with altitude cannot be explained by thermoregulation theory, and therefore factors other than temperature must come into play in this instance.
meridianus we observed at high altitudes in the present study.
Muller 1785) X X CEPODA Mesocyclops meridianus (Kiefer 1926) X XX Thermocyclops decipiens (Kiefer 1929) XX XXX x: scarce (25%), xx: frequent (50%), xxx: very TABLE 5 Jaccard Similarity (in percentages) of zoo-heleoplankton taxa in the artificial ponds A' A B C A' / A 47 / B 24 19 / C 8 3 12 / TABLE 6 The fish taxa in ponds Fishes A B C Astyanax lineatus * *** * Cichlasoma dimerus ** * * Crenicichla lepidota * Ctenobricon hallen *** * Cyphocharax sp.