meroplankton


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meroplankton

[¦mer·ə′plaŋk·tən]
(biology)
Plankton composed of floating developmental stages (that is, eggs and larvae) of the benthos and nekton organisms. Also known as temporary plankton.
References in periodicals archive ?
This means that many coral reef invertebrates and fishes with a planktonic larva, could be distributed and shared throughout the region (Warner & Goodbody, 2005; Salas, Molina-Urena, Walter, & Health, 2010), emphasizing the need for more studies of meroplankton and their role in population recruitment in the Caribbean of Central America.
Rotifers, copepods, cladocerans, and meroplankton dominate in the northeastern Gulf of Riga (Kotta et al., 2009).
The highest density of diatoms, mainly of Aulacoseira granulata, meroplankton algae and R-strategist, common in river plankton, reflect the suitable conditions for the development of the group, especially at lower temperatures and lower concentrations of nutrients, as shown by the negative correlation with these factors.
Meroplankton, represented mainly by larvae of bivalves and crustaceans, contributed to the biodiversity of plankton communities in the North.
Testing the hypothesis that meroplankton (bivalve larvae) are transported offshore by upwelling.
Seasonal composition and food web relationships of marine organisms in the nearshore zone of Kodiak Island including ichthyoplankton, meroplankton (shellfish), zooplankton, and fish.
Peak abundance of meroplankton was coincident with bloom conditions of P.
The early life history of many nearshore benthic invertebrate species involves the release of planktonic larvae (meroplankton) that remain in the water column until ready to settle as juveniles or adults (reviewed by Levin & Bridges 1995).
Leaving to one side formal classifications based on size and zoological groupings, it is important to distinguish between two different types of zooplankton organisms: those that pass all their life in the plankton (holoplankton) and those that only colonize the pelagic environment at some stage in their life cycle (meroplankton).
Such observations probably reflect both the temporal instability of the current patterns themselves and the fact that meroplankton will not always disperse as passive particles (Burton and Feldman 1982).
Plankton samples contained a variety of larvae (meroplankton) and many other zooplankton (holoplankton).
Such animals are termed holoplankton, while the temporary residents of the plankton (such as the larval forms) are called meroplankton.