ban

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ban

1
Law an official proclamation or public notice, esp of prohibition

ban

2
(in feudal England) the summoning of vassals to perform their military obligations

ban

a monetary unit of Romania and Moldova worth one hundredth of a leu

Ban

 

in Croatia (until 1921) the title of the viceroy; in Yugoslavia (during the period 1929–41) the title of a governor in charge of a banovina. During the years 1939—41 this term was used for the chief executive of autonomous Croatia.


Ban

 

medieval legal term (in Western Europe) signifying, in particular, the right of the head of government to exercise supreme power, such as judicial (as in judicial ban), military (to raise troops and command them, known as military ban), or administrative power in a fortified place (burg ban). In the early Middle Ages, the ban belonged to the king and to responsible state officials; in the period of feudal disintegration, it was transferred to various feudal lords. In Germany, from the tenth century, the creation of so-called regional bans (territory over which one or another ruler held judicial and administrative power) was one of the manifestations of the trend toward formation of territorial principalities.


Ban

 

smaller monetary unit of the Socialist Republic of Rumania; equal to 1/100 leu. Coins of 50,25,15,10,5,3, and 1 ban are in circulation.

BAN

(Body Area Network) A personal wireless network for body-worn sensors. In the U.S., the 2360-2400 MHz frequency band is reserved, and the 2360-2390 range is designated for indoor communications at health care facilities. See wearables, WPAN and 802.15.
References in periodicals archive ?
The mean Crohn's Disease Activity Index (CDAI) score was higher in both budesonide groups than in the mesalamine group, and both budesonide groups had a higher proportion of patients with CDAI scores over 300.
All patients with a history of ulcerative colitis should consider taking mesalamine for preventing colorectal cancer.
The panelists rated mesalamine, sulfasalazine, and prednisone as safe to use during pregnancy and nursing.
We had an initial response rate of 94% observed on continuous therapy, and a continued response of 89% following discontinuation of therapy, suggesting mesalamine is an excellent first-line therapy.
of the University of Chicago, who found up to 68% of ulcerative colitis patients don't take their prescribed mesalamine regularly (Practical Gastroenterology 2004;28:16-22).
I see mesalamine as having at best only a limited role in treating patients with Crohn's disease.
Zoenasa is a fixed-dose combination of mesalamine and a second potent anti-inflammatory agent not previously used in this indication.
8-g dose of mesalamine is safe and significantly more effective than the standard 2.