mescal


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mescal

1. a spineless globe-shaped cactus, Lophophora williamsii, of Mexico and the southwestern US Its button-like tubercles (mescal buttons) contain mescaline and are chewed by certain Indian tribes for their hallucinogenic effects
2. a colourless alcoholic spirit distilled from the fermented juice of certain agave plants
References in periodicals archive ?
Thirty-somethings flock to this monument to mescal for the relaxed post-work vibe and the chapulines, a snack of salted grasshoppers.
"You see more and more mescal in bars; the industry likes it," concurs Jose Hermosillo, founder of Casa Noble Tequila.
Nevertheless, Parker admitted to a friend that he really did "not know anything about this peculiar habit of eating mescal buttons." Parker also told Senator Harry Lane of Oregon that he believed alcohol was more damaging than peyote and pointed out that Thomas Sloan and Judge Hiram Chase (Omaha), both SAI members, defended the use of peyote.
Patron started the sagebrush rebellion that brought tequila into the main-stream with the wonders of the cactus juice done right, smashing tequila's reputation as an evil twin of agave-based mescal ("Eat the worm!").
Secondly, there was the Chiricahuas' thirst for alcoholic beverages, which included tiswin prepared from corn sprouts and mescal purchased in Mexico, that inevitably undercut efforts to locate these tribesmen on permanent reservations in the U.S.
Instead, Americans have loved and consumed Mexican food in large quantities almost from the moment it was available--from canned chili and tamales in the early 20th century to fast-food tacos in the 1960s, sit-down eateries in the 1970s, and ultra-pricey hipster mescal bars today.
Among the topics are principles of sensory self-life evaluation and its application to alcoholic beverages; the gas chromatography-olfactometry of alcoholic beverages; the sensory characteristics and sensory analysis of table wines; the production and sensory properties of gin, grape-based brandies, sugar cane spirits cachaca and rum, tequila, and mescal; and new applications of conjoint measurement for consumer research in the wine industry.
In Mexico, this weevil causes economic losses in tequila, mescal, henequen, and Mexican tuberose production (Camino et al.
rail: In the second chapter, you mention Heinrich Kluver's classic, Mescal and the Mechanisms of Hallucinations, which made me think of one of the prominent, if not the earliest, consumers of mescaline, Henri Michaux, who shares with Allen Ginsberg, Gregory Corso, and William Burroughs the fascination with the use of drugs to heighten consciousness.
Dutchman's breeches, Elephant's ear, Hydrangea, Jack-in-the-pulpit, Jasmine, Jimsonweed, Larkspur (Delphinium), Laurel, Lily of the valley, Mescal bean, Mushrooms, Nightshades, Philodrendron, Poinsettia, Prunus species, Tobacco, Yellow jasmine, Yews Taxus species.
Where Mexicans have mescal and Italians have grappa, Bulgarians have this grape or plum brandy, homemade versions of which will put you under the table faster than you can say "Nazdrave!"