mesopause


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mesopause

[′mez·ə‚pȯz;]
(meteorology)
The top of the mesosphere; corresponds to the level of minimum temperature at 50 to 60 miles (80 to 95 kilometers).

Mesopause

 

a transition layer of the atmosphere (at an altitude of about 80 km) between the mesosphere, where the temperature decreases with altitude, and the thermosphere, where the temperature increases with altitude. The mesopause is thus a level of minimum temperature. Noctilucent clouds are observed at this altitude.

mesopause

The upper boundary of the mesosphere, which divides the thermosphere from the mesosphere. The lowest temperatures in the atmosphere—approximately −490°F (−290°C)—are encountered at the mesopause, which lies at a height of 50 to 55 miles (80–90 km) above the sea level. See mesosphere.
References in periodicals archive ?
Above the mesopause, in the thermosphere, the (kinetic) temperature increases and can rise to 1000[degrees]C (depending on solar activity) at altitudes of 250 km remaining quasi stable with increasing height.
The increasing release of methane into the atmosphere from sources such as rice paddies, land-fills and cattle, increases the amount of water in the dry mesopause region.
`So the combination of decreasing temperatures and increasing water vapour in the mesopause region, increases the likelihood of cloud formation,' Burns says.
Burns notes that any advantage in looking for climate change in the mesopause is still a matter of scientific debate.
The cosmoid idea may also explain why the polar mesopause gets so cold.
It is thought that increased solar activity may cause the temperature at the mesopause to rise because of stronger ultraviolet radiation.
These waves take over an hour to reach the mesopause emission level and must traverse the stratosphere and mesosphere, which process the wave energy (absorption, breaking, and other effects) via wind shear and critical layers (e.g., Alexander et al.
On this night, close to the new moon, there is no moonlight illuminating the scene--clouds are detectable via reflection of downwelling hydroxyl nightglow emitting principally from a region near the mesopause.