mess of pottage


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mess of pottage

hungry Esau sells birthright for broth. [O.T.: Genesis 25:29–34]
See: Bribery
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Selling it for a mess of pottage? It would have killed him."
He is charged with giving up a distinctively Christian identity and selling its birthright for a mess of pottage. He is seen as the beginning of a movement that culminated in Barth's liberal teachers acquiescing to or even supporting the Kaiser's war machine.
The path of whiteness thus comes to be associated with materialism, with a "mess of pottage," as James Weldon Johnson's Autobiography of an ExColoured Man (1912) famously has it, and blackness with altruism and idealism.
The Israelis will not give up a right to self- defense for the proverbial mess of pottage.
McCabe concludes with a flourish: "If you, as a director, help this development [dramaturgy] along by participating in this abdication [of directorial control], you will have sold your profession's birthright for a mess of pottage." The rise in dramaturgy, McCabe contends, has to do with the "growing decadence of the director's art."
The transaction puts me in mind of Oscar Wilde's line about the humble Irish village where "the inhabitants eked out a precarious living by taking in each other's washing." Disney may have acquired a mess of pottage, but it fortunately gave no better than it got.
But when those who are ordained or otherwise claim to speak for God do it, they are settling for the mess of pottage that is politics and demeaning themselves and their faith in the process."
They claim that it is possible to continue using the name without buying into the mess of pottage which the SBC has stirred up in the past twenty years.
Tory party activists might be tempted to think his weekly sumo wrestling bout with Mr Blair has been sold for a mess of pottage.
I also have a question: Though that era's standards cannot be transposed to our own, have we not sold our birthright for a mess of pottage? This question is not for our colleges alone, but for the whole church.
History tells us that even if well-meaning legislators replace current laws with more industry-friendly measures, then sometime soon after, the American people are likely to discover that their lawmakers have just bought them a mess of pottage. Just something to think about as you ponder the fact that Charlie Keating, like Michael Milken, is out of jail and on the prowl.
Similarly, the exciting Westway project, whose impact on Manhattan in the 20th century would have been comparable to that of Central Park in the 19th, was traded in for the mess of pottage of a brief additional subsidy for mass transit.