metabolic cost

metabolic cost

[¦med·ə‚bäl·ik ′kȯst]
(industrial engineering)
The amount of energy consumed as the result of performing a given work task; usually expressed in calories.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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By having someone run and walk on a treadmill while wearing the shorts and measuring the amount of oxygen they consumed while breathing, the researchers calculated that the metabolic cost of walking and running were reduced by 9.3 and 4 per cent respectively, compared to running without wearing the shorts.
It reduces the metabolic cost - a measure of oxygen consumption while breathing and while walking by 9 per cent and of running by 4 per cent.
In addition, there are currently no data on the actual metabolic cost of these types of single stair climbing bouts.
Following are the list of parameters evaluated for 4th, 5th, and 6th instars caterpillars: (i) Relative consumption rate (RCR), (ii) relative metabolic rate (RMR), (iii) relative growth rate (RGR), (iv) feed conversion efficiency (ECI), (v) conversion efficiency of digested food (ECD), (vi) approximate digestibility (AD), and (vii) metabolic cost (CM) according to PARRA (1991).
Choi said that they discovered that the ideal power that reduced metabolic cost was actually greater than biological norms.
The Army has examined systems such as a bionic boot that could reduce the metabolic cost of carrying a load and potentially increase walking speed, she said.
Our giant brains must have helped our ancestors survive in the African savannah where the first modern humans evolved, but they also came at a metabolic cost. The human brain represents just 4 percent of our body weight, but it consumes 20 percent of our energy, said Mauricio Gonzalez-Forero, a mathematical evolutionary biologist at the University of St.
However, normal walking incurs a significant metabolic cost. In healthy untrained adults, walking at a self-selected comfortable speed demands 32% of maximal oxygen consumption (V[O.sub.2] max).
Ironically, the metabolic cost of snow shoveling (oxygen consumption for the whole body) may not be more than typical sub-maximal exercise like a light jog, but the oxygen cost to the heart is likely to be very high.
Consequently, amputees using powered prostheses have preferred walking speed, metabolic cost at a given speed, and contralateral limb impacts that are not significantly different from those of nonamputees [5, 6].
Sharma and Sarkar had concluded that in any physical activity, a large proportion of the energy was used to move the body weight and the metabolic cost was directly proportional to the body weight.