Myopathy

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myopathy

[mī′äp·ə·thē]
(medicine)
Any disease of the muscles. Also known as myopathia.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Myopathy

 

progressive muscular dystrophy; a hereditary disease.

Myopathies can be transmitted as autosomal recessive or dominant, or sex chromosome-linked traits. Myopathies result from metabolic disturbances in muscle cells and a change in the biosynthesis of nucleic acids; the degradation of muscle proteins is considerably more rapid than their biosynthesis. In myopathies, muscles become flaccid and some of the fibers are replaced by fatty tissue. Electron microscopy reveals structural changes in the membranes of muscle cells. The main symptoms of the disease are increasing muscular weakness, symmetrical muscular atrophy, decrease in tendon reflexes and, in the later stages, bone and joint deformity. Autonomic trophic nerve functions are invariably impaired.

Myopathy is treated with anticholinesterase preparations, anabolic hormones, and vitamins B and E. Preventive measures include early diagnosis and detection of the heterozygous carrier state for the myopathy gene by using electrophysiological and biochemical tests.

REFERENCES

Badalian, L. O., V. A. Tabolin, and Iu. V. Vel’tishchev. Nasledstvennye bolezni u detei. Moscow, 1971.
Hausmanowa-Petrusewicz, I. Myshechnye zabolevaniia. Warsaw, 1971. (Translated from Polish.)

L. O. BADALIAN

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
When evaluating patients you suspect may have metabolic myopathy, a physical exam may reveal muscle contractures, muscle swelling, or proximal muscle weakness.
It's important to get an accurate diagnosis of a specific metabolic myopathy so the affected person can modify diet and exercise and monitor potentially serious disease effects.
Supporting our findings, both “sandwich” and “target” signs are very rare in other neuromuscular disorders in the literatures, such as Duchenne muscular dystrophy,[sup][10],[22] lipid metabolic myopathy,[sup][23] inflammatory myopathy,[sup][8] LGMD2A,[sup][24] Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy,[sup][25],[26],[27] and congenital muscular dystrophy with rigid spine syndrome (RSMD1).[sup][17],[28]