metabolize


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Wikipedia.

metabolize

[mə′tab·ə‚līz]
(physiology)
To transform by metabolism; to subject to metabolism.
References in periodicals archive ?
Most primate ancestors wouldn't have been able to metabolize ethanol, the results showed.
Eating one cup of raisins metabolizes into the blood sugar equivalent of 26 teaspoons of table sugar.
This is perhaps best illustrated by current clinical trials in which researchers are examining whether preemptive genetic testing for the ability to metabolize warfarin improves outcomes in patients requiring oral anticoagulation.
Gregg Heller, general merchandise and personal care buyer at May's Drug Stores, reports similar success with Metabolize and $ave.
The allowed patent, "Methods for Evaluating the Ability to Metabolize Pharmaceuticals," describes the selection of chemotherapeutic agents based on the presence or absence of this variant, which is commonly called CYP3A4*1B.
(We, too, produce gas when our cells metabolize nutrients.
The researchers said that gut bacteria metabolizes carnitine into trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO), a metabolite they previously linked to the promotion of atherosclerosis in humans, Xinhua News reported.
The way a person metabolizes arsenic is reflected in a pattern of relative concentrations of arsenic metabolites in urine.
CYP2D6 codes for enzymes that metabolize chemicals such as medications that target the central nervous system (including various antidepressants, stimulants, and codeine--all drugs with different chemical structures), drugs of abuse, neurotoxicants, procarcinogens (substances that become carcinogenic only when metabolized into more reactive compounds), and even the body's own neurotransmitters.
Smith says that his team isn't sure whether muscle cells contribute to weight gain and insulin resistance or whether having these conditions reduces a muscle's ability to metabolize sugar and fat.
These vesicomyid clams don't eat in the usual sense but get their nutrients from bacteria that live in their gills and metabolize sulfide from the vents.
The finding also implies that many bacteria in deep-sea hydrothermal vents, for instance, may metabolize hydrogen instead of sulfur.