metal-rich star

metal-rich star

[′med·əl ¦rich ′stär]
(astronomy)
A star in which the ratio of metals (elements heavier than helium) to hydrogen is greater than that of the Hyades.
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We then came to realize that we had caught HuBi 1 at the exact moment when its central star underwent a brief 'born-again' process to become a hydrogen-poor [WC] and metal-rich star, which is very rare in white dwarf stars evolution."
Therefore, usually, a Kronos-like metal-rich star would contain "all the other elements enhanced at a similar level, whereas Kronos has volatile elements suppressed, which makes it really weird in the general context of stellar abundance patterns," the study's lead author Semyeong Oh, a graduate student at Princeton University, said in (https://www.princeton.edu/news/2017/10/12/devourer-planets-princeton-researchers-dub-star-kronos) a statement Thursday.
Higher metallicities might support the formation of large cores, explaining why we're more likely to find a gas giant orbiting a metal-rich star.
So far, of the 750 confirmed exoplanet discoveries, there is a better statistical likelihood of a metal-rich star playing host to planets.
It could also have ripped away M32p's disk, creating the giant stream of metal-rich stars in Andromeda's halo and explaining M32's compact structure.
It has long been noted that giant planets with short orbital periods tend to be associated with metal-rich stars.
Theories of migration inwards from more distant orbits have been considered, and the metallicity of the star may be influential, with 'hot Jupiters' seeming more common around metal-rich stars.
Astronomers have found most extrasolar planets orbiting younger, relatively metal-rich stars. That led astronomers to rate ancient globular clusters as unlikely venues for planets.
Cooler gas fragments into smaller star-forming clumps than warmer gas, meaning metal-rich stars will generally start smaller than metal-poor ones.
Most of our Galaxy's central regions are dominated by metal-rich stars, meaning that they have approximately the same metal content as our Sun, and are arrayed in a football-shaped structure called the "bar." These stars in the bar were found to orbit in roughly the same direction around the Galactic Centre.
The levels would not be as high as those in a pulsar's disk, but any increase in heavy elements could affect planet formation: on one hand, gas planets form more readily around metal-rich stars; on the other hand, rapid gas dispersion might keep the disk's mass low, making it difficult to produce gas giants.
The results, announced by Lars Buch-have (University of Copenhagen) and his colleagues at the American Astronomical Society's summer meeting and published in Nature, appear to run counter to two decades of ground-based observations that suggest metal-rich stars are more likely to harbor planets, particularly gas giants like Jupiter.

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