metal-rich star

metal-rich star

[′med·əl ¦rich ′stär]
(astronomy)
A star in which the ratio of metals (elements heavier than helium) to hydrogen is greater than that of the Hyades.
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Therefore, usually, a Kronos-like metal-rich star would contain "all the other elements enhanced at a similar level, whereas Kronos has volatile elements suppressed, which makes it really weird in the general context of stellar abundance patterns," the study's lead author Semyeong Oh, a graduate student at Princeton University, said in (https://www.
Higher metallicities might support the formation of large cores, explaining why we're more likely to find a gas giant orbiting a metal-rich star.
So far, of the 750 confirmed exoplanet discoveries, there is a better statistical likelihood of a metal-rich star playing host to planets.
Cooler gas fragments into smaller star-forming clumps than warmer gas, meaning metal-rich stars will generally start smaller than metal-poor ones.
Most of our Galaxy's central regions are dominated by metal-rich stars, meaning that they have approximately the same metal content as our Sun, and are arrayed in a football-shaped structure called the "bar.
It has long been noted that giant planets with short orbital periods tend to be associated with metal-rich stars.
Astronomers have found most extrasolar planets orbiting younger, relatively metal-rich stars.
The results, announced by Lars Buch-have (University of Copenhagen) and his colleagues at the American Astronomical Society's summer meeting and published in Nature, appear to run counter to two decades of ground-based observations that suggest metal-rich stars are more likely to harbor planets, particularly gas giants like Jupiter.
The high prevalence of giant planets around metal-rich stars has been well established (to astronomers, "metals" refer to elements heavier than hydrogen and helium).
If its existence is confirmed, perhaps this locally delayed generation of very-low-metallicity stars should be called Population 0, since Population I stars are metal-rich stars and Population II stars are moderately metal-poor.
The astronomers say the metal-rich stars are the tattered remains of a different cluster that Omega Cen has swallowed and nearly assimilated.
Instead, write the authors, the reason why planets tend to accompany metal-rich stars is simply because "the higher the metallicity of the star, the higher will be the probability that planet formation will occur.

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