metastatic capacity

metastatic capacity

[‚med·ə‚stad·ik kə′pas·əd·ē]
(medicine)
The malignancy of a tumor.
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In fact, at the onset, M is characterized by a non-tumorigenic radial growth phase (RGP), inside the epidermis (intraepidermal) or within the papillary dermis (microinvasive), devoid of metastatic potential, which may be followed, early or late, by a tumorigenic vertical growth phase (VGP), with deeper extension in the dermis or beyond, nodular confluence, mitotic activity, and metastatic capacity (Table 1).
Although WDL lacks metastatic potential, WDL that has differentiated into DDL has metastatic capacity [3].
This precursor is transferred to certain gene "switches" that in turn increase the metastatic capacity of cancer cells by activating a specific gene program.
"The identified molecular target acts as a master switch and regulates multiple functions of breast cancer cells, including their growth, migration and metastatic capacity. Manuka honey appears to turn off this master switch, thereby inhibiting the ability of cancer cells to survive.
To evaluate the contribution of FBXW7 to the regulation of RCC, its expression was upregulated in the 786-O and ACHN cell lines, and the subsequent migration and invasion results showed that upregulation of FBXW7 inhibited metastatic capacity of RCC.
In accordance with previous studies suggesting that KISS1 expression inhibits ovarian tumor spread (4), an increased plasma kisspeptin concentration may signify a low intrinsic metastatic capacity; however, an increased plasma kisspeptin concentration during stage 1 ovarian carcinoma may merely be a consequence of early tumorigenesis.
Regardless of whether metastatic capacity is acquired according to the tumor progression model, Brabetz and colleagues make an argument for "the existence of a dynamic component to human tumor progression." (10) They point out that metastatic tumors can reiterate the primary tumor's differentiated gene expressions.
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