meteoric water


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Related to meteoric water: vadose water

meteoric water

[‚mēd·ē′ȯr·ik ′wȯd·ər]
(hydrology)
Groundwater which originates in the atmosphere and reaches the zone of saturation by infiltration and percolation.
References in periodicals archive ?
Meteoric water are responsible for the modification of dolomitization phases and dissolution.
In addition, the Mn element content in the karst cave-filling calcite and karst breccia was higher than that in the bedrock, indicating that they were formed through complete open meteoric water karstification conditions (Huang et al.
Calcite recrystallization is due to the percolation of meteoric water and subareal processes.
The amount of sodium were very low in meteoric waters, due to the low distribution coefficient of sodium in the water and therefore the amount of lime will be lower in rocks affected by diagenesis [3].
However, interaction with midto low-latitude meteoric water or seawater can also produce such compositions (Longstaffe 1982).
The Arctic Ocean that supplies Nares Strait carries a meteoric water end-member signal of-18.
The more dilute meteoric waters plot close to the Global Meteoric Water Line (GMWL; Fig.
The early gem-rhodochrosite was deposited at temperatures of 280 [degrees] to 310 [degrees] C from fluids that were slightly diluted with meteoric water.
Meteoric water (rain or snow) is the most likely external source, but how it might be transported to the subduction zones is yet unknown.
Supply line retention system: Creation of drainage pipes for connection of meteoric water to settling basin / retention system and for connection well water to existing pipes, trench depths up to 6m; Undercrossing connection with pipe DN 500; 1 400 m HPP and PP pipes DN 110 to 630; 25 control shafts; 15 mud collectors;
The subsurface is characterized by fluids that may be a mixture of both marine and meteoric water (Folk 1974) or a mixture of chemically complex brines that resulted from long term rock-water interaction under elevated pressures and temperatures (Stossell and Moore 1983).