methyl cinnamate


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methyl cinnamate

[′meth·əl ′sin·ə‚māt]
(organic chemistry)
C6H5CH:CHCO2CH3 A white crystalline compound with strawberry aroma; soluble in ether and alcohol, insoluble in water; boils at 260°C; used to flavor confectioneries and in perfumes.
References in periodicals archive ?
Tenders are invited for Procurement of methyl cinnamate
(1982) used the same attractants that we used, plus a fifth attractant, methyl cinnamate. They also found eucalyptol (referred to by the alternate term "cineole" in their study) to be most effective in terms of orchid bee abundance and species richness collected among the 4 attractants (excluding methyl cinnamate).
At low concentrations, citral was the most liked and methyl cinnamate was the least liked among the young adults.
Recently, its presence was recorded in phytophysiognomic studies of gallery forests within areas of Cerrado in Mato Grosso State, Brazil, where males were attracted and captured in methyl cinnamate baited traps (Anjos-Silva et al., 2006; Silva et al., 2013).
Variations in the chemical composition of the essential oils are used to differentiate the basil as the following types: European, French, or Sweet; Egyptian, Reunion, or Comoro; Bulgarian, Java, or Methyl Cinnamate; and Eugenol.
Oils rich in 1.8-cineole (22%), linalool (49.7%), methyl chavicol (47%), and methyl cinnamate (65.5%) were found in Brazilian plants [24].
Preliminary chemical analyses of floral scent compounds emitted by white- and yellow-flowered Sonnets revealed that only white flowers produced methyl cinnamate (MC), which smells spicy like cinnamon, whereas only yellow flowers produced methyl benzoate (MB), a strongly sweet-smelling compound.
The following day methyl benzoate and methyl cinnamate solutions (0.1%, as before) were prepared and pipetted onto filter papers wicks, as described for the field assays, and a wick placed into each flower of the same twelve plants.
A) Total number of plant visits according to scent treatment (MB: methyl benzoate, MC: methyl cinnamate, Control: ethanol only).
To improve the shelf life of strawberries, USDA-ARS scientists incorporated two plant natural volatile compounds, carvacrol and methyl cinnamate, into strawberry puree edible films.
The investigators used carvacrol, the main volatile compound of oregano, and methyl cinnamate, the methyl ester of cinnamic acid, formulated in film-forming solutions at 0.75% concentrations, because of their antibacterial and antifungal properties.
Strawberry puree edible films were used as carriers for the controlled release of carvacrol and methyl cinnamate antimicrobial vapors, without direct contact with the product.