methyl mercaptan


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methyl mercaptan

[′meth·əl mər′kap‚tan]
(organic chemistry)
CH3SH Colorless, toxic, flammable gas with unpleasant odor; boils at 6.2°C; insoluble in water, soluble in organic solvents; used as a chemical intermediate. Also known as methanethiol.
References in periodicals archive ?
Chemical Safety Board, comments on the findings of the board's investigation into the release of methyl mercaptan at the DuPont Plant in La Porte, Texas, that killed four workers.
Recently, the Ministry of Energy, Science, Technology, Environment and Climate Change issued a statement that acrylonitrile as well as two other gases namely acrolein and methyl mercaptan detected in the Pasir Gudang area.
In particular, the document limits oil content of hydrogen sulfide, methyl mercaptan, ethyl mercaptan and other hazardous chemical compounds.
Accidental releases of methyl mercaptan can be extremely dangerous, said EPA Region 6 Compliance Assurance and Enforcement Director Cheryl Seager.
15 2014, veteran operator Crystal Rae Wise opened a faulty valve on a pipe carrying methyl mercaptan, a chemical used to manufacture DuPont's popular insecticide called Lannate.
(1) If the redox potential of a must is not increased during [H.sup.2]S formation (aerated must), the [H.sup.2]S can react with other compounds such as ethanol and sulfur-containing amino acids to form mercaptans (most notably, methyl mercaptan).
Hydrogen sulphide (H2S), methyl mercaptan (CH3SH), and dimethyl sulphide ((CH3)2S) contribute to the malodour.
An example would be naturally occurring methyl mercaptan oxidizing the injected tert-butyl mercaptan blend, resulting in an under-odorized natural gas supply.
Volatile sulphur compounds like hydrogen sulphide, methyl mercaptan, and dimethyl sulphide are the gases which are mostly involved in causing halitosis.
The sulphur-containing molecule methyl mercaptan is naturally produced in significant quantities on Earth only by microbes, including some that make their pungent presence known in the human body, reports New Scientist.
(7) It is most sensitive for hydrogen sulfide and less sensitive for methyl mercaptan. Also, if VSCs are shown to be low by the monitor, it may not accurately determine halitosis when other factors are involved such as alcohols, phenyl compounds and polyamines.
Trace amounts of methanethiol (methyl mercaptan) were also added to the fuel, giving it the distinctive rotten-egg smell that would reveal any significant leakage.