methyl sulfide

methyl sulfide

[′meth·əl ′səl‚fīd]
(organic chemistry)
(CH3)2S Flammable, colorless liquid with disagreeable aroma; soluble in ether and alcohol, insoluble in water; boils at 38°C; used as a chemical intermediate. Also known as dimethyl sulfide.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The mixture of compound 2 (3.92 g, 5.00 mmol), potassium carbonate (2.87 g, 20.80 mmol), 2-chloroethyl methyl sulfide (3.76 g, 34.02 mmol) and sodium iodide (3.34 g, 22.30 mmol) in anhydrous acetone (200 mL) was boiled by mixing under condenser for 3 days in a nitrogen atmosphere.
Sulfur-containing compounds, such as allicin and allyl methyl sulfide, are known to be the main responsible constituents of Allium plants for most of their pharmacological effects [32, 33].