micaceous


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micaceous

[mī′kā·shəs]
(geology)
Pertaining to or resembling mica.
References in periodicals archive ?
Most of these Western Australian soils contain little plant-available K and other forms of K due to their low contents of micaceous and K-feldspar minerals.
Arakiite is only found on one surface where it occurs as aggregates of micaceous plates over an area of approximately 15 x 10 mm.
Limited Tenders are invited for 1)mio (micaceous iron oxide) epoxy paint as per specification tre-167.
garnetiferous schist, quartz-mica schist, calcareous schist, schistose marble, hornblende bearing quartz mica schist and micaceous marble.
Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin disorder affecting 1% of the population worldwide, which is clinically characterized by erythematous, sharply demarcated papules and rounded plaques, covered by silvery micaceous scales.
Compared with materials based on splinter mica, micaceous and mica plastics papers have a greater thickness uniformity, increased and more uniform electrical strength.
A solvent-borne coating based on a PVC (polyvinyl chloride) copolymer and acrylic resin containing zinc phosphate and micaceous iron oxide was used as an external layer in the duplex system.
The sedimentary rocks comprise light grey thin- to thick-bedded (5-50 cms), fine- to medium-grained, slightly micaceous, quartz-rich, feldspathic sandstone intercalated with dark grey to black laminated siltstone and shale and minor thinly-laminated, light green siltstone, and shale.
According to True North Gems, corundum found in micaceous primary ore is relatively easy to extract, whereas secondary gabbroic ore is harder, making the recovery of unbroken stones more difficult.
The scalp dermatitis it causes "often has a little finer scale than the thick micaceous scale we see in psoriasis," she noted.
In particular, the use of lamellar (flat) pigment particles, such as leafing aluminum flake and micaceous iron oxide, work well to decrease coating permeability (Figure 2).
To further support this statement, Reed [20] conducted laboratory core tests by flowing deionized water, 3% NaCl brine, and 3% Ca[Cl.sub.2] brine through cores extracted from micaceous sand formations to determine permeability reduction, hypothesizing that mica alteration is a result of the exchange of [K.sup.+] cations with cations of larger sizes, such as [Na.sup.+], [Li.sup.+], [Ca.sup.2+,] and [Mg.sup.2+], as depicted in Figure 1.