micro-holographic

micro-holographic

A holographic storage method from General Electric. Announced in 2009, initial discs are expected to store 500GB, and drives are also expected to play Blu-ray, DVD and CD media as well. See holographic storage.
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They could then be displayed using a projector with a laser source and micro-holographic optical elements.
GE researchers said they have successfully demonstrated a threshold micro-holographic storage material that can support 500 gigabytes of storage capacity in a standard DVD-size disc.
GE's micro-holographic discs will be able to be read and recorded on systems very similar to a typical Blu-ray or DVD player.
Although GE's holographic storage technology represents a breakthrough in capacity, the hardware and formats are so similar to current optical storage technology that the micro-holographic players will enable consumers to play back their CDs, DVDs and BDs.
GE researchers have successfully demonstrated a threshold micro-holographic storage material that can support 500 gigabytes of storage capacity in a standard DVD-size disc.
According to a report by BBC News, the micro-holographic disc, which is the same size as existing DVD discs, is aimed at the archive industry.
Micro-holographic discs can store more data than DVDs or Blu-ray because they store information on the disc in three dimensions, rather than just pits on the surface of the disc.
In a statement, the firm said, "The hardware and formats are so similar to current optical storage technology that the micro-holographic players will enable consumers to play back their CDs, DVDs and Blu-ray discs."
The company claims that the hardware in the new technology is so similar to current optical storage technology today, micro-holographic players can made backward compatible to play back CDs, DVDs and BDs.
"Because GE's micro-holographic discs could essentially be read and played using similar optics to those found in standard Blu-ray players," Lawrence said "Our technology will pave the way for cost-effective, robust and reliable holographic drives that could be in every home.
Timothy's design is a circular, handheld device operated by a micro-holographic "virtual" buttons and is called Orbit.
They can then be displayed using a projector with a laser source and micro-holographic optical elements (see summary in sidebar).