Microclimate

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microclimate

[¦mī·krō′klī·mət]
(climatology)
The local, rather uniform climate of a specific place or habitat, compared with the climate of the entire area of which it is a part.

Microclimate

Localized climate conditions within an urban area or building.

Microclimate

 

climate of the ground layer of air resulting from small-scale differences in the earth’s surface within a local climate. For example, a distinction is made in the local climate of a forest area between the microclimate of forest glades and the edges of forests and in the local climate of a city between the microclimate of squares, side streets, public gardens, and yards. Differences in the microclimate diminish rapidly with distance from the earth’s surface. They are also largely dependent on the weather, increasing in fair, calm weather and leveling out in overcast weather, in the absence of insolation, and when it is windy. Study of the microclimate requires the organization of a dense network of random meteorological observations and the comparison of these observations with the readings of a permanent basic weather station characterizing the corresponding local climate. Microclimatic surveys from motor vehicles are widely used. The peculiarities of the microclimate must be taken into account when positioning crops or moving them into new areas, when engaging in various types of land reclamation, in industrial and civilian construction, and so forth.

REFERENCES

Sapozhnikova, S. A. Mikroklimat i mestnyi klimat. Leningrad, 1950.
Geiger, R. Klimat prizemnogo sloia vozdukha. [2nd ed.] Moscow, 1960. (Translated from English.)
Mikroklimat SSSR. Leningrad, 1967.

S. P. KHROMOV

References in periodicals archive ?
The combination of close proximity to the water and screening by the high topographic feature produces highly unusual microclimatological conditions at the Franklin Bluffs station, which are not adequately resolved by the interpolating procedure.
Thus, although deterministic heat budget models based on continuous microclimatological records (i.e., conditions immediately adjacent to an organism) are useful for examining the consequences of organismal characteristics such as size, shape, and spatial position (e.g., Bell 1992, 1995, Helmuth 1997, 1998), a more generalized approach is necessary to estimate body temperatures over longer temporal and larger spatial scales.
Using a simple deterministic, individual-based model developed for intertidal mussels (Helmuth 1998) and microclimatological records collected from two semi-exposed rocky intertidal beaches, I explore the degree of error introduced by averaging environmental conditions over a range of time scales.
(2) How do the maple species differ in shoot architecture and photosynthetic performance across the gap-understory microclimatological gradient?