microfilm


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Acronyms, Wikipedia.
Related to microfilm: computer output microfilm

microfilm

a strip of film of standard width on which books, newspapers, documents, etc., can be recorded in miniaturized form

microfilm

[′mī·krə‚film]
(graphic arts)
Greatly reduced film records of such things as books, newspapers, engineering drawings, reports, and manuscripts; copies are made on fine-grain film of 16, 35, 70, and 105-millimeter size, permitting easy storage and handling.

microfilm

A continuous film strip that holds several thousand miniaturized document pages. See micrographics.


Microfilm and Microfiche
Billions of pages have been recorded on film and fiche, but optical methods are replacing this old imaging method.
References in periodicals archive ?
The company's flagship products, the ST ViewScan and book scanning products incorporate the latest technology to improve scanning, viewing, and editing both microfilm and printed materials within libraries, schools, and other collections.
Our solution offering includes; document capture, workflow automation, cloud-based and on-premise document management software, electronic forms and mobile data capture solutions, records management, email management software, document scanning services, document scanners and microfilm scanners.
In our vault, for microfilm newspapers, we have over 10,000 newspapers.
The Microfilm process is a key component in Baker Perkins' new AutoCook series of cooking systems.
The archive follows nearly two years' of assembling the best microfilm of the Stars and Stripes collection available.
Lots of people think microfilm is old fashioned and think it is irrelevant in today's market place.
The current rush to access records held on microfilm by banks provides a case in point of why microfilm still remains an effective and efficient information storage format, said Mr Negus.
The Papers of Isaac Backus, 1630-1806: A Guide to the Microfilm Edition provides a systematic guide to the Backus's microfilm collection.
Since the introduction of microfilm in the 1930s, many institutions have thrown out their original newspaper collections or sold them to dealers.
Antonovich provided $1,200 and The Friends of the La Crescenta Library contributed $300 to purchase the 84 reels of microfilm with scanned issues of The Crescenta Valley Ledger, which was eventually renamed The Ledger.
Allen explained that, when punters placed bets, they had to be run through the microfilm system to time them, with Cassidy later adding winning results.
As poor (and self-destructing) as microfilm is, it provides more people with more access to the past than fastidious preservation of originals could allow.