microlithography

microlithography

[‚mī·krō·li′thäg·rə·fē]
(materials)
The transfer of a pattern or image from one medium to another, as from a mask to a wafer, with image features in the micrometer range or smaller.

microlithography

Using X rays instead of light rays to form the patterns of elements on a chip.
References in periodicals archive ?
This work is presented by Suzuki (project manager, Next Generation Lithography Tool Development, Nikon Corporation) and Smith (director, Center for Nanolithography Research, Rochester Institute of Technology) as both introduction to the science and technology of microlithography and as reference for more experienced readers seeking a wider knowledge and deeper understanding of the field.
The $30 billion market for microlithography equipment was led by North America in 2003 with a 28% market share according to Business Communications Co.
The next generation of microlithography tools under development utilizes deep-ultraviolet radiation near 157 nm.
The company develops, manufactures, markets and supports products used in the technology areas of microlithography, surface conditioning and low-k spin-on dielectrics.
Moreover, the ability to reproduce three-dimensional patterns and films of varying thickness distinguishes MIMIC from standard microlithography.
This work offers an integrated mathematical view of the physics and numerical modeling of image formation in projection microlithography.
The conventional techniques of microlithography just don't work well at that scale.
The new standards use microlithography to make series arrays of large numbers of Josephson junctions to produce higher voltages -- 2,000 for 1 volt, 19,000 for 10 volts.