micrometeoroid


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

micrometeoroid

[¦mī·krō′mē·dē·ə‚rȯid]
(astronomy)
A very small meteoroid with diameter generally less than a millimeter.
References in periodicals archive ?
In [7, 8] the effects of micrometeoroids and space debris impacts on satellite solar panels are described.
Aerogel was opted again as a passive detector to capture the micrometeoroids and orbital debris particles.
Previous testing [1, 2] had already demonstrated that such sensors might be used to detect and locate micrometeoroid and orbital debris (MMOD) impact events on spacecraft.
Thermal Micrometeoroid Garment works like a thermos to protect astronauts from the sun's rays.
The tether has to be robust in order to stand the micrometeoroid and other orbital debris impacts.
In addition, the accumulation of water frost is also likely to be highly dependent on local conditions, such as temperature, thermal cycling and even geologically recent "impact gardening" in which micrometeoroid impacts redistribute the location and depth of volatile compounds.
He has designed vital mechanical and electromechanical devices and systems, such as noise abatement for airbags, aircraft engines, and mining equipment; micrometeoroid shields for satellites; load-measurement/monitoring systems for oil platforms, and extra-wide-range load cells.
Despite the extra time, Zvezda failed to meet NASA safety standards for noise and micrometeoroid protection.
Initially, it was thought the hole was the result of a (https://twitter.com/StationCDRKelly/status/1035403383123918849) micrometeoroid impact , a tiny fleck of space junk hurtling through space at thousands of kilometers per hour.
Attaching this expandable module to the space station offers NASA the opportunity to expose it to the radiation, temperatures, pressures and micrometeoroid environment, and measure how it holds up."
The rings are composed primarily of water ice, but they contain small amounts of rocky material contributed by micrometeoroid bombardment.
By sheltering organisms from such hazards as ultraviolet radiation and micrometeoroid bombardment, caves "could be among the only places on Mars to find evidence of past or present microbial life," says Glen Cushing of the U.S.