microsensor


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microsensor

[′mī·krō‚sen·sər]
(engineering)
A submicrometer- to millimeter-size device that converts a nonelectrical physical or chemical quantity, such as pressure, acceleration, temperature, or gas concentration, into an electrical signal; it is generally able to offer better sensitivity, accuracy, dynamic range, and reliability, as well as lower power consumption, compared to larger counterparts.

Microsensor

A very small sensor with physical dimensions in the submicrometer to millimeter range. A sensor is a device that converts a nonelectrical physical or chemical quantity, such as pressure, acceleration, temperature, or gas concentration, into an electrical signal. Sensors are an essential element in many measurement, process, and control systems, with countless applications in the automotive, aerospace, biomedical, telecommunications, environmental, agricultural, and other industries. The stimulus to miniaturize sensors lies in the enormous cost benefits that are gained by using semiconductor processing technology, and in the fact that microsensors are generally able to offer a better sensitivity, accuracy, dynamic range, and reliability, as well as lower power consumption, than their larger counterparts.

Mechanical microsensors form perhaps the largest family of microsensors because of their widespread availability. Microsensors have been produced to measure a wide range of mechanical properties, including force, pressure, displacement, acceleration, rotation, and mass flow. Force sensors generally use a sensing element that converts the applied force into the deformation of the elastic element.

Applications for chemical and biochemical microsensors are environmental monitoring and medicine. Applications in the medical industry may involve monitoring blood, urine, and breath, which contain a wealth of information about the patient's state of health. Only a few such devices now exist. Examples include a glucose biochemical microsensor and ion-selective field-effect devices used to measure blood pH. The use of microsensors to gather medical diagnostic information is an attractive proposition, and eventually there may even be implanted microsensors to diagnose health problems, using smell-sensitive array devices. See Bioelectronics

References in periodicals archive ?
Simultaneous microsensor long-term measurements of pH and [Ca.sup.2+] within the inner EPF of Arctica islandica were performed over 7 h.
A dedicated electromechanical test bench was set up to carry out the electromechanical characterizations of the fabricated microsensor samples (see Figure 10(b)).
Zhukov, "Thin magnetically soft wires for magnetic microsensors," Sensors, vol.
Balakrishnan, "Energy Efficient Communication Protocol for Wireless Microsensor Networks," in Proceedings of the 33rd annual Hawaii international conference on System Sciences, Miami, Hawaii, pp.
Balakrishnan (2000) "Energy-efficient Routing Protocols for Wireless Microsensor Networks" in 33rd Hawaii International Conference of System Sciences (HICSS), Maui, HI.
Second, the microsensor is designed for fixing on the vessel (outside) that completely eliminates dangerous cardiovascular complications and allows to operate for a long-term basis (for at least 5 yrs).
Hodo, "Polymer-based microsensor for soil moisture measurement," Sensors and Actuators, B: Chemical, vol.
[8.] Heinzelman W.R., Chandrakasan A., Balakrishnan H.: An Application-Specific Protocol Architecture for Wireless Microsensor Networks.
Min et al., "Architecture for a power aware distributed microsensor node", Proceedings of the IEEE Workshop on signal processing systems (SiPS'00), October 2000.
Balakrishnan, "An application-specific protocol architecture for wireless microsensor networks," IEEE Transactions on Wireless Communications, vol.
The VITROS 4600 Chemistry System also incorporates state-of-the-art features including MicroSlide Technology, MicroTip Technology, MicroSensor Technology,
Among them are ambient ionizing mass spectrometry, the analysis of water in confined geometries and at interfaces, in-situ optical studies of solid-oxide fuel cells, electrochemical aspects of electrospray and laser desorption/ionization for mass spectrometry, adaptive microsensor systems, chiral separations, fundamentals of rotationally induced hydrodynamics and applications to high-speed bioassays, microsystems for capturing low-abundance cells, and advances in mass spectrometry for lipidomics.