microsensor


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microsensor

[′mī·krō‚sen·sər]
(engineering)
A submicrometer- to millimeter-size device that converts a nonelectrical physical or chemical quantity, such as pressure, acceleration, temperature, or gas concentration, into an electrical signal; it is generally able to offer better sensitivity, accuracy, dynamic range, and reliability, as well as lower power consumption, compared to larger counterparts.

Microsensor

A very small sensor with physical dimensions in the submicrometer to millimeter range. A sensor is a device that converts a nonelectrical physical or chemical quantity, such as pressure, acceleration, temperature, or gas concentration, into an electrical signal. Sensors are an essential element in many measurement, process, and control systems, with countless applications in the automotive, aerospace, biomedical, telecommunications, environmental, agricultural, and other industries. The stimulus to miniaturize sensors lies in the enormous cost benefits that are gained by using semiconductor processing technology, and in the fact that microsensors are generally able to offer a better sensitivity, accuracy, dynamic range, and reliability, as well as lower power consumption, than their larger counterparts.

Mechanical microsensors form perhaps the largest family of microsensors because of their widespread availability. Microsensors have been produced to measure a wide range of mechanical properties, including force, pressure, displacement, acceleration, rotation, and mass flow. Force sensors generally use a sensing element that converts the applied force into the deformation of the elastic element.

Applications for chemical and biochemical microsensors are environmental monitoring and medicine. Applications in the medical industry may involve monitoring blood, urine, and breath, which contain a wealth of information about the patient's state of health. Only a few such devices now exist. Examples include a glucose biochemical microsensor and ion-selective field-effect devices used to measure blood pH. The use of microsensors to gather medical diagnostic information is an attractive proposition, and eventually there may even be implanted microsensors to diagnose health problems, using smell-sensitive array devices. See Bioelectronics

References in periodicals archive ?
The microsensor will be only a few millimeters in size, and it will be embedded in the spring in the trunk of the vine, allowing the vine to grow around it.
The authors have been developing microsensors mainly for geophysical/near-surface environmental measurement under the "Subsurface Microsensing Project" since 1993 [1].
Researchers at NIST have developed microsensors that detect nmol/mol quantities of chemical warfare agents (CWAs), including sarin (GB), tabun (GA) and sulfur mustard (HD).
2] microsensors were prepared as described previously for oxygen sensors, but with slight modification (7).
We speculate that this effect is caused by the reduced selectivity of the membrane of the commercially available resin microsensor, the composition of which is not published.
Contract award notice: Intelligent development environment for flexible and fast microsensor prototyping IEMP.
The launch of technologically advanced microsensors is also contributing positively toward growth in the global microsensor market.
Nova Biomedical announces the latest in critical care blood gas analyzers--the Stat Profile Prime CCS, featuring ZERO maintenance cartridges and MicroSensor technology for exceptional value in a critical care whole blood analyzer.
A sampling of specific topics includes: adhesive bonding technology for reliably embedding electronic modules into textile circuits, a wearable remote brain machine interface using smartphones and the mobile network, smart hydrogel-based biochemical microsensor array for medical diagnostics, and the basic characteristics of RFID antenna for urination detection.
No moving parts, a patented media isolated microsensor principle, and a straight 'see through' flow channel guarantee highest reliability.
When particles this size are deposited on the tip of a silicon microsensor, they attract large molecules floating in the air; the attracted chemicals change the oxide's electrical conductance in a way that is easy to detect.
Researchers are developing microsensor chips that can be embedded into pipes at the manufacturing stage and can be located from a few metres away