microtektite

microtektite

[‚mī·krə′tek‚tīt]
(geology)
An extremely small tektite, 1 millimeter or less in diameter.
References in periodicals archive ?
While looking for the fossilized remains of a tiny organism called Foraminifera, co-author of the study Morgan Schaller from New York's Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute noticed a microtektite in the sediment he was examining, which belonged to the period when the ancient global warming occurred.
Analysis of the beads suggests they are microtektites, particles that form when the explosive impact of an extraterrestrial object sends molten debris hurtling into the atmosphere where it cools and recrystallizes before falling back to Earth.
The beads turned out to be microtektites, particles that form when an extraterrestrial object (https://www.ibtimes.com/massive-meteorite-powerful-nuclear-bomb-crashed-sea-australia-2795183) crashes into Earth , sending molten debris into the atmosphere where they cool and recrystallize before falling back to the surface.
2002); Os- and Cr-isotopic anomalies (Turekian 1982; Luck & Turekian 1983; Shukolyukov & Lugmair 1998; Quitte et al., 2003, 2007; Trinquier et al., 2006); tektites, microtektites and microkrystites with varying degrees of post-depositional alteration (Smit & Klaver 1981; Montanari et al.
Natural microtektites are small glass droplets derived from melting and quenching of terrestrial rocks during hypervelocity meteorite impacts on the Earth (see [1] and refs.
Analysis of Probable K-T Boundary Microtektites, Mississippi Embayment, Southeastern Missouri.
glassy silicates (these spherules are probably microtektites), produced by a partial fusion of extraterrestrial and terrestrial matter at the moment of the impact explosion of the meteorite.
This equation is consistent with the higher specific gravities of microtektites and it may show the role that gas bubbles play in determining specific gravity.
As the excitement mounted, yet more researchers found microtektites in the K-T boundary layer.
, 1998), its distinct characteristics have been found to include a combination of all, or some of the following: presence of microtektites, shocked quartz (Izett, 1991), an iridium spike, sudden increase in clay with geochemical signatures of an origin associated with carbonaceous chondrites (Alvarez and Asaro, 1990; Luck and Turekian, 1983; Shykolyukov and Langmuir, 1998; and others).
Because of the spherules' shape and chemical composition, he proposes that they are "microtektites," formed when an impact hurls droplets of molten rock into the air, where they quickly cool into a glassy form.