decompression

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Related to Microvascular decompression: trigeminal neuralgia

decompression

[dē·kəm′presh·ən]
(engineering)
Any procedure for the relief of pressure or compression.

decompression

The reduction of atmospheric pressure. Particularly, various techniques for preventing decompression sickness (also called caisson disease by gradual decompression. Decompression sickness is caused by the evolution of nitrogen bubbles in the body as a result of the effects of reduced atmospheric pressure. Normal symptoms of decompression sickness are the bends, chokes, and creeps; unconsciousness; and neurological symptoms. It can be potentially fatal if the original higher pressure is not restored. Fighter crews use pressure suits and pressure breathing to avoid the effects of decompression sickness. A sudden decrease in cabin pressure, which may be the result of either some component of the aircraft—such as doors, windows, or the cockpit canopy—giving way or a rupture taking place in the structure, is called explosive decompression. See also chokes and creeps.

decompression

The restoration of compressed data back to their original size. See data compression.
References in periodicals archive ?
KEYWORDS: Facial muscle spasm; Microvascular decompression; Delayed healing.
Vagoglossopharyngeal neuralgia treated by microvascular decompression and glossopharyngeal rhizotomy: clinical results of 21 cases.
Microvascular decompression for trigeminal neuralgia: recurrences and complications.
Prior to this period, all patients who underwent microvascular decompression by the senior author (John Y.
For instance, she complained that a device had been implanted in her head and she had the scar to prove it, pointing to the scar from her microvascular decompression surgery.
This study reviews 108 patients treated over a 1-year period at the University of Florida with one of two surgical procedures: radiofrequency lesioning and microvascular decompression. The short-term results of this experience are reviewed and discussed.
Contributors also describe NIOM in surgery of the vertebral column, spinal cord, tethered cord, peripheral nerves, cerebellopotine angle (microvascular decompression and tumor), thoracic aorta, carotid artery, and in cases of epilepsy-related surgery, selective dorsal rhizotomy and lumbosacral surgery.
Microvascular decompression is successful 80%-90% of the time, but it requires an open craniotomy and a hospital stay, the radiation oncologist noted.
Although it is difficult to compare published treatment studies because of differences in the definitions of typical trigeminal neuralgia, microvascular decompression has at most a 90% success rate, Dr.
Trigeminal neuralgia is treated surgically by microvascular decompression. In microvascular decompression, the needle is introduced through foramen ovale.
In addition, some of the surgical procedures may contribute to some complications such as microvascular decompression (MVD) which is able to relieve an abnormal compression of an artery to the trigeminal nerve.
Kim YH, Han JH, Kim CY, Oh CW: Closed-suction drainage and cerebrospinal fluid leakage following microvascular decompression: A retrospective comparison study.