microangiopathy

(redirected from Microvascular disease)
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microangiopathy

[‚mī·krō‚an·jē′äp·ə·thē]
(medicine)
The development of lesions in small blood vessels throughout the body.
References in periodicals archive ?
Microvascular disease damages very small blood vessels.
"Our study suggests that microvascular disease in any part of the body, such as the eyes, kidneys or feet (neuropathy) may be linked to decreased blood vessel function in other parts of the body, putting patients at risk for potential lower-limb amputations," said Joshua A.
Various mechanisms such as endothelial dysfunction, subclinical atherosclerosis, microvascular disease, vasomotor dysfunction, inflammation and oxidative stress have been considered to have a role in the etiopathogenesis.
In a word use of the concept of prediabetes can be useful tool for intervention to prevent both macrovascular and microvascular disease in clinical and public health spheres.
This guidance is based upon epidemiological, case-control and cohort studies, which link smoking with cardiovascular disease premature death, and microvascular disease, including foot ulcers.2 It also notes that smoking may contribute to development of type 2 diabetes, and smoking cessation helps improve metabolic parameters, blood pressure and albuminuria.
Despite the fact that our patient had normal epicardial coronary arteries, he did have a history of diabetes, severe hypertension and left ventricular hypertrophy, which can cause coronary microvascular disease.
There is evidence that neurodegeneration measured by either mfERG or OCT is present in patients with normal fundoscopic examination.[sup][9] The question is whether the neurodegenerative process can be considered a predictor of microvascular disease or even an active mediator of the microvascular impairment.
The microvascular disease tends to occur predominantly in vascular endothelium of kidney, retina and vasa nervorum where glucose uptake is independent of insulin activity.
There is only amputation of the dead tissue and usually problems with wound healing due to the subclinical microvascular disease in the remaining "viable" tissue.
"If microvascular disease is happening in the kidneys, that same disease could very well be affecting the heart, and there could be a direct link that we should be looking at," Dr.
The primary outcomes were the development of diabetes and the prevalence of microvascular disease. Also known as small vessel disease, this is a narrowing of the small arteries in the heart most commonly seen in people with diabetes and/or high blood pressure.