microwatt


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microwatt

[′mī·krə‚wät]
(mechanics)
A unit of power equal to one-millionth of a watt. Abbreviated μW.
References in periodicals archive ?
Chip technology built on Bluetooth 5 has successfully lowered the average power consumption of IoT beacons to the microwatt level, thereby enabling these devices to be battery-free when paired with a small-form factor photovoltaic cell.
The maximum output power of 0.93 microwatts is obtained at 0.92 volts.
These devices employ application-specific designs to achieve power consumption levels and form factors that are orders of magnitude lower than general purpose systems, incorporating sensing, signal processing, data conversion, and communication subsystems into areas on the order of a square millimeter and power consumption levels in the microwatt range [1].
A reasonable unit of measure is microWatt per centimeter square ([micro]W/[cm.sup.2]), with energy represented in watts and surface area in [cm.sup.2].
Thus, even a 1 megabit channel would require less than 1 microwatt. This method uses very little power but is susceptible to noise that may arise from mechanical vibration of the catoms.
Peter Tavner, head of engineering at Durham University, was speaking after a team from the Atomic Energy Commission in Grenoble, France, got about one microwatt of power from the smallest water drops.
"This device uses less than a microwatt," Irazoqui marvels.
The Medixair can generate 22,500 microwatt seconds per square centimetre - enough to kill E Coli, which has a 'kill energy' of 5,400 microwatts, TB, which has a kill energy of 6,200 microwatts and the Staphylococcus Aureus - the bug linked behind MRSA - which has a kill energy of 2,600 microwatts.
Marvell's microwatt WLAN transceiver technology coupled with a powerful, scalable, network aware application processing functionality offer OEM's the ultimate flexibility and maximum power savings.
This is small enough to be made by a single fabricator in a few hours, but large enough to contain a small CPU, a microwatt of motors or generators, or a fabricator system flexible enough to duplicate itself if given the right commands.
"We almost never see more than 1 microwatt per square centimeter from a base station," Mantiply said.