middle-class radicalism

middle-class radicalism

forms of political radicalism, including left-wing voting, by people from non-manual backgrounds. Parkin (1968) employed the term to refer to members of the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament (CND). Middle-class radicalism is of interest in much the same way as WORKING-CLASS CONSERVATISM as a form of class-deviant political action, i.e. activity contrary to prevailing or expected class norms. Two distinct locations of types of ‘middle class’ class-deviant political activity can be identified:
  1. the lower middle class left’, left-wing voting and action by those marginal to the middle class, e.g. routine manual workers; and
  2. the ‘upper middle class left’, forms of left-wing political activity particularly associated with membership of the caring professions and public sector employment (Jary, 1978). see also VOTING BEHAVIOUR.
References in periodicals archive ?
But he was also carving out a proper space for British middle-class radicalism.
Robert Johnston is assistant professor of history at Yale University and author of a forthcoming book on middle-class radicalism in Portland, Oregon.
See Sears, The Sex Radicals (Lawrence, 1977); John Spurlock, Free Love: Marriage and Middle-Class Radicalism in America, 1825-1860 (New York, 1988).