middling


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middling

[′mid·liŋ]
(mining engineering)
An ore product intermediate in mineral content between a concentrate and a tailing.
References in periodicals archive ?
Hunt's examination of the limits and possibilities for the women of middle-class households is deft and pivotal to her interpretation of middling life.
The leading student of the antebellum middle class, Stuart Blumin, defines it along fairly arbitrary occupational lines, focusing on the line between the middling and lower sort, and arguing that what distinguished the two was nonmanual versus manual work.
While the middling sort in late eighteenth-century America had different occupations from the increasingly white collar middle class of the antebellum decades, they may have shared other attributes.
Stuart Blumin and other scholars have insisted that the most important social cleavage in late eighteenth and early nineteenth-century America was between the elite and everyone else; that the middling and lower sort were lumped together in contemporary visions of the social order.
14) Taken together, the changes suggest that the older patriarchal conception of the social order was being challenged by a rise in the status of the middling sort (also of youth, and, to some degree, women, although these changes will not be discussed here).
Such texts were open to use by the middling sort in a way that was not possible before.
Thus the story of manners in late eighteenth-century America is not simply the story of the spread of aristocratic refinement in tension with the republicanism of the rest of the culture, as Richard Bushman suggests; for the middling sort repudiated the basis of aristocratic power even as they seized the aristocratic armor of manners and remade it for their own purposes.
Only about a tenth of revolutionary-era conduct works were addressed to the elite alone, while over two-thirds addressed the middling sort.