midge


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midge,

name for any of numerous minute, fragile fliesfly,
name commonly used for any of a variety of winged insects, but properly restricted to members of the order Diptera, the true flies, which includes the housefly, gnat, midge, mosquito, and tsetse fly.
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 in several families. The family Chironomidae consists of about 2,000 species, most of which are widely distributed. The herbivorous larvae are found in all freshwaters; the larvae of some species live in saltwater. Midge larvae are an important source of food for larger aquatic insects and fish. The larvae of some species of the genus Chironomus, which are called freshwater bloodworms, are unusual in that they contain the protein hemoglobin. The pupae are active and aquatic. The adults, which look like slender mosquitoes, are often seen swarming over or near water, and large courting and mating swarms may contain millions of insects. The larvae and pupae of the net-wing midges, family Blepharoceridae, live in fast-flowing freshwater; they attach to rocks by suction disks and feed mainly on algae. The biting midges belong to the genus Culicoides of the family Ceratopogonidae; they are the smallest of the bloodsucking insects and are common pests in the NE United States, where they are called punkies, sand flies, and no-see-ums. The adults have mouthparts that pierce and suck and inflict irritating bites on humans; some species ride the wings of dragonflies and lacewings, sucking the blood of their hosts. Gall midges, family Cecidomyiidae, damage many plants by causing formation of plant galls in which the larvae live (see gnatgnat,
common name for any one of a number of small, fragile-looking two-winged flies of the suborder Nematocera, order Diptera, which includes the families Tipulidae (crane flies), Bibionidae (hairflies), Ceratopogonidae (biting midges), Chironomidae (true midges), Cecidomyidae
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). Midges are classified in the phylum ArthropodaArthropoda
[Gr.,=jointed feet], largest and most diverse animal phylum. The arthropods include crustaceans, insects, centipedes, millipedes, spiders, scorpions, and the extinct trilobites.
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, class Insecta, order Diptera.

midge

[mij]
(invertebrate zoology)
Any of various dipteran insects, principally of the families Ceratopogonidae, Cecidomyiidae, and Chironomidae; many are biting forms and are vectors of parasites of man and other vertebrates.

midge

1. any fragile mosquito-like dipterous insect of the family Chironomidae, occurring in dancing swarms, esp near water
2. any similar or related insect, such as the biting midge and gall midge
References in periodicals archive ?
We have looked at the genetics of this to see whether you can pass on whether you are attractive or not to midges - and it turns out you can.
And we're now working on control programmes for diseases like malaria and dengue in tropical countries using the science that we learned originally from the midge.
Burridge added: "Since Dessie, Midge continued to enjoy racing and went whenever she could.
The midge genome lacks many of the segments of DNA and other repeat elements linked to the production of proteins, which are found in most animal genomes.
Caption: An Antarctic midge lives only about a week as an adult (top) after spending years as a larva (bottom).
But 60-year-old Midge, who organised Band Aid and Live Aid with Geldof, said he's sure his friend "will see this through".
Specifically, T umbilicatus owing to its longer ovipositor (which is more than twice as long as those from the next largest species) has the ability to oviposit last in a gall and attack juvenile stages of the midge or the other parasitoids when the galls are more mature and have a greater diameter.
If a specific pool of midge heads tested positive, individual abdomens from the corresponding stored pool were tested separately by RT-PCR.
Her dam is Calderdale Sue, bred in Trawden by Stuart Bennett, and now owned by Andrew Throup, of Silsden, who bred Midge.
The NFU issued information about the product as concern grows about potential Schmallenberg infection by midges biting livestock over the next few weeks.
With climate change projecting warmer, wetter weather leading to larger midge populations, these could prove a very useful alternative in reducing their numbers.