millennium

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Related to millennially: Millennial Kingdom

millennium

[Lat.,=1,000 years], the period of 1,000 years in which, according to some schools of Christian eschatology, Christ will reign again gloriously on earth. Belief in the millennium, based on Rev. 20, has recurred in Christianity since the earliest times. Today it is held and taught by the AdventistsAdventists
[advent, Lat.,=coming], members of a group of related religious denominations whose distinctive doctrine centers in their belief concerning the imminent second coming of Jesus (see Judgment Day).
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 and some other conservative evangelical bodies. Belief in the millennium is called chiliasm by historians of the ancient church. See Judgment DayJudgment Day
or Doomsday,
central point of early Christian, Jewish, and Islamic eschatology, sometimes called the Day of the Lord. References to it throughout the Bible are numerous.
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.

millennium

the Christianity the period of a thousand years of Christ's awaited reign upon earth

millennium

(1) One thousand years. As it pertains to the calendar, we recently passed through the second millennium (January 1, 1001 to December 31, 2000), and the third millennium began January 1, 2001. See Y2K problem.

(2) (Windows Millennium) See Windows ME.
References in periodicals archive ?
The presidential friendliness of Ronald Reagan and the two Bushes to such fundamentalist, nationalistic Christianities and their conduct of millennially themed rituals for military engagements (treated in chapter 5, "A Fundamentalist Vision for Christian America: From the Scopes Trial to George W.
The enlightened position (to which most twenty-first-century white Americans are afraid not to pretend in even the slightest degree), the millennially optimistic consciousness, at which George Webber eventually arrives and which he expresses as his "credo"--quoted as the concluding words of Reeves's book--makes an apt ending for Webber's spiritual journey, but it is hardly a position from which much sustained meaningful fictional engagement of racism might be derived.
14) In Operation, the fate of the child is indissociable from the fate of the narrative and from narrative itself, which has become progressively millennial rather than millennially progressive.