miller

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miller

1. another name for milling machine
2. a person who operates a milling machine
3. any of various pale coloured or white moths, especially the medium-sized noctuid Apatele leporina
04. an edible basidiomycetous fungus, Clitopilus prunulus, with a white funnel-shaped cap and pinkish spores, often forming rings in grass

Miller

1. Arthur. born 1915, US dramatist. His plays include Death of a Salesman (1949), The Crucible (1953), A View from the Bridge (1955), and Mr Peters' Connections (1998)
2. (Alton) Glenn. 1904--44, US composer, trombonist, and band leader. His popular compositions include "Moonlight Serenade". During World War II he was leader of the US Air Force band in Europe. He disappeared without trace on a flight between England and France
3. Henry (Valentine). 1891--1980, US novelist, author of Tropic of Cancer (1934) and Tropic of Capricorn (1938)
4. Hugh 1802--56, Scottish geologist and writer
5. Sir Jonathan (Wolfe). born 1934, British doctor, actor, and theatre director. His productions include Shakespeare, Ibsen, and Chekhov as well as numerous operas. He has also presented many television medical programmes
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

miller

[′mil·ər]
(mechanical engineering)
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in classic literature ?
In the winter, also, he was extremely lonely, as the Miller never came to see him then.
The king was greatly delighted to see all this glittering treasure; but still he had not enough: so he took the miller's daughter to a yet larger heap, and said, 'All this must be spun tonight; and if it is, you shall be my queen.' As soon as she was alone that dwarf came in, and said, 'What will you give me to spin gold for you this third time?' 'I have nothing left,' said she.
But now the Miller, plodding along the road, had come opposite to where the yeomen lay hidden, whereupon all four of them ran at him and surrounded him.
"First time I ever heard him, too," Miller volunteered.
"Well!" ejaculated Miss Miller, lowering her parasol and looking at the embroidered border.
Miller, who, not being quite so much absorbed as he ought to have been, contrived to commit various high crimes and misdemeanours, which excited the wrath of the fat gentleman to a very great extent, and called forth the good-humour of the old lady in a proportionate degree.
I must, indeed, say, I never saw a fonder couple; but what is their fondness good for, but to torment each other?" "Indeed, mamma," cries Nancy, "I have always looked on my cousin Anderson" (for that was her name) "as one of the happiest of women." "I am sure," says Mrs Miller, "the case at present is much otherwise; for any one might have discerned that the tender consideration of each other's sufferings makes the most intolerable part of their calamity, both to the husband and wife.
Miss Miller was more ordinary; ruddy in complexion, though of a careworn countenance; hurried in gait and action, like one who had always a multiplicity of tasks on hand: she looked, indeed, what I afterwards found she really was, an under-teacher.
Something in the sentiment sounded familiar, and, looking at the Miller more closely the War-horse recognised his master in disguise.
``Come on, churl, an thou darest: thou shalt feel the strength of a miller's thumb!''
The miller thought she must mean one of his puppies or kittens, so promised the nixy at once what she asked, and returned to his mill full of hope.
Miller, who had become impatient of the fatigue of land travel, and was for immediate embarkation at all hazards.